7 healthy carbs that can help you stay in shape

·3 min read

Carbohydrates are the number one enemy of many dieting women. As much as we love pasta, bread, and any type of sweet you can think of, far too many of us have been brainwashed into believing that carbohydrates are bad for our health. They're not going to go along with it!

Carbohydrates are required for energy, and deprivation will result in you falling headfirst into a gallon of moose tracks, which will do nothing to help you lose weight. However, there is no need to read every nutrition label.

As recommended, incorporate these nutritious and healthy carbohydrates into your meals to help you stay in shape and fed throughout the day.

Barley

Barley water in glass with raw and cooked pearl barley wheat/seeds. selective focus
Barley water in glass with raw and cooked pearl barley wheat/seeds. selective focus

Barley may aid in the fight against hunger by raising blood sugar levels more slowly than, say, a doughnut, allowing you to avoid the sugar spike and fall that can leave you feeling hungry. Barley groats or whole hull-less barley are more popular, but they provide even more beneficial elements, including 20 to 25% of your recommended fibre in a single serving.

Green peas

Photo by R Khalil from Pexels
Photo by R Khalil from Pexels

A half-cup of peas contains 12% of the zinc needed for daily consumption. This mineral, best known for its ability to treat colds, may also help reduce hunger by increasing leptin levels, a hormone that tells the brain when your stomach has had enough to eat.

Pasta made from whole grains

Photo by Engin Akyurt from Pexels
Photo by Engin Akyurt from Pexels

Dietary whole grains (about three servings per day) were linked to a lower BMI and less abdominal fat, confirming previous research that linked an entire grain-rich diet to a smaller waistline. Maintaining portion sizes between 100 and 200 calories is critical for ensuring that nutrient-dense carbs are part of a well-balanced meal rather than the entire meal.

Oatmeal

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels
Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Half of the fibre in oatmeal is soluble fibre, which dissolves into a gel-like substance in the stomach, increasing satiety by delaying digestion. Additionally, increasing your intake of soluble fibre may help you lose visceral fat, which is deep abdominal fat that surrounds vital organs and has been linked to metabolic problems, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, among other things.

Quinoa

Cooked quinoa in white bowl, top view
Cooked quinoa in white bowl, top view

Quinoa is a complete protein because it contains all nine essential amino acids required by your body to build lean, calorie-burning muscle while avoiding the saturated fats found in animal protein. Quinoa is also free of gluten. Four grams of fibre per half-cup meal may also help your lunch or dinner stay in your stomach longer.

Beans

Photo by Nicholas Githiri from Pexels
Photo by Nicholas Githiri from Pexels

According to research, bean eaters had a 23% lower risk of developing a bulging waistline and a 22% lower risk of becoming obese. Although the fibre content of each type of bean varies, they are all excellent choices because they also contain protein and iron. Keep in mind that you should rinse any canned beans to reduce the salt content.

Air-popped popcorn

Photo by Megha Mangal from Pexels
Photo by Megha Mangal from Pexels

If you're craving a salty snack, popcorn is a better option than chips. Popcorn not only provides more short-term satiety than fried potatoes, but it also helps to reduce hunger sensations in people who are trying to lose weight or keep their calorie intake under control. Furthermore, you can eat three cups of air-popped kernels (which count as a serving of whole grains) for the same number of calories as nine plain potato chips.

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