Blind date: ‘He said, “Do you want to get married”’

·4 min read
<span>Photograph: Linda Nylind/The Guardian</span>
Photograph: Linda Nylind/The Guardian

Katie on Jack

What were you hoping for?
A cross between Tarzan and Louis Theroux.

First impressions?
He was a Louis Theroux and through.

What did you talk about?
Everything from meal deals to Shakespeare. (His fave deal is a questionable choice of ham sandwich and plain Pringles…)

Any awkward moments?
When he said, “Do you want to get married?” followed by a hasty, “In general, not to me.”

Good table manners?
Yes, but sadly he ate one of my anchovies (which he hates) to prove his bravery. It was painful to watch because I only had four and I love them.

Best thing about Jack?
Very charismatic and a nice laugh.

Would you introduce him to your friends?
Maybe.

Describe Jack in three words
Ate my anchovy.

What do you think he made of you?
Excellent food choice.

Did you go on somewhere?
Only for a deep and meaningful chat with my taxi driver.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
On the cheek. But I won’t tell you which one.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
The temperature, but luckily he brought three coats.

Marks out of 10?
7.

Would you meet again?
I’ll let fate decide that one.

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.

How to apply
Email blind.date@theguardian.com

Jack on Katie

What were you hoping for?
To get to know someone new, enjoy an actual meal out and stay warm-ish.

First impressions?
Full of energy. Katie was stylish, positive and enthusiastic.

What did you talk about?
Katie’s love of swimming, April Fools’ Day pranks and crafting of tote bags. We also swapped book recommendations.

Any awkward moments?
She hadn’t actually applied for the date: her sister put her up to it, and I think Katie was less keen than I was.

Good table manners?
Well, it was pizza, so, yes.

Best thing about Katie?
Despite us realising quickly that we weren’t a match, Katie remained engaging and inquisitive.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Yes, but I’m not sure she’d have much in common with them.

Describe Katie in three words
Fun, enthusiastic, chic.

What do you think she made of you?
An adequate dining companion who wanted to get to know her.

Did you go on somewhere?
Only to a different table to be closer to a heater. That said, we did stay late, got cold and took advantage of the bar until almost everyone else left.

Related: Blind date: ‘She might have thought I was an environment-polluting beer snob’

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
No, I think we both realised we weren’t compatible.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I would also have done handstands for the photographer before our date – I was far too conservative.

Marks out of 10?
7.

Would you meet again?
I don’t think so. Katie was good company and a laugh, but there weren’t any sparks.

• Katie and Jack ate at Gotto Trattoria, Canalside, London E15.

Fancy a blind date? Email blind.date@theguardian.com

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