Can jazz music help you slim down? Strange tricks to keep the pounds off

Shereen Dindar
Contributing Writer
Shine On
Can jazz music help you slim down? Strange tricks to keep the pounds off

What if dieting didn't involve, well, dieting?

It turns out the secret to slimming down isn't just eating better and exercising. According to science (yes, science!), it's the details that can make or break your diet.

Everything from the kind of music we listen to as we settle in to eat to the colour of our plates affects our waistline, allowing us to literally trick ourselves into being healthier.

Because this is basically the best news we've heard all day, we've rounded up the scientifically proven easiest ways to diet, without actually dieting.

1) Play jazz music while you eat

The type of lighting and music in a restaurant or at home can influence the amount of food we consume. Researchers found that dimming the lights and playing soft jazz music caused people to eat 175 fewer calories. People also rated the food as more enjoyable.

2) Eat on a plate that contrasts with the colour of your food

Eating on a coloured plate that contrasts the colour of your food can result in a person serving themselves 22 per cent less food. Also, try using a tablecloth that contrasts the colour of your plate, which can result in a 10 per cent reduction of food eaten.

3) Navigate the buffet line wisely

If you serve yourself healthy food first at a buffet, there will be less room on your plate for unhealthy items, and in the end you will end up with less calories on your plate. But more importantly, when you put healthier buffet items on your plate first, you end up with approximately 31 per cent less food overall on your plate.

4) Top your coffee table with healthy food

Research shows that people will often choose healthy snacks that are within arm's reach over their preferred unhealthy snack that requires work to get.

5) Pick small plates

Smaller plates and bowls can cause you to eat less because people tend to portion out their food according to the size of the dish. Large plates and bowls can cause people to overeat by about 28 per cent.