Carlos Correa surprises 4-year-old fan who was 'heartbroken' by his engagement

After the Houston Astros won the World Series, Carlos Correa took on three new titles — world champion, fiancé and heartbreaker.

By now, you’re probably aware of baseball’s most aw-shucks moment of the year: Correa, Houston’s 23-year-old star shortstop, dropping to one knee during a postgame interview and asking girlfriend Daniella Rodriguez to be his wife. It was a sweet moment, no doubt, but it left some of Correa’s many admirers a little sad. He was off the market.

That included 4-year-old fan Scarlett Sanchez, who was seen in a video crying and saying Correa broke her heart. Correa himself then shared the video on Twitter and said he wanted to meet the young girl. And so, by the power of TV, it has happened.

Sanchez was a guest on Houston’s KPRC Channel 2, doing an interview about her love for Correa and the Astros when he surprised her:


This is a sweet moment too. Sanchez says Rodriguez is cute and a princess, but Correa says Sanchez is the same and gives her a hug. Correa told KPRC while he was there:

“It’s not about the baseball players. I’m a human being as well. I want to be identified as a good baseball player, but an even better person. Things like this is what drives me every single day. Fans supporting me throughout my whole career and inspiring me every single day to do my best out there on the field,” he said.

Seems like Correa is doing quite well these days as a human being — on the field, off the field and hugging little kids who adore him.

Carlos Correa and 4-year-old fan Scarlett Sanchez when they met at a Houston TV station. (KPRC)

More MLB coverage from Yahoo Sports:

– – – – – –

Mike Oz is the editor of Big League Stew on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at mikeozstew@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter!

More from Yahoo Sports:
Dan Wetzel: Arrested UCLA players released in China, but future is uncertain
Why won’t the Texans just be honest about Kaepernick?
Jeff Passan: Roy Halladay was the last of his kind
Pat Forde: College basketball in state of emergency