Coronavirus cases in Canada: More than 95,000 infections and 7,700 deaths

Bryan Meler
Associate Editor, Yahoo News Canada

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

Total COVID-19 cases in Canada: 95,057 diagnoses and 7,773 deaths (as of June 6, 5:30 p.m. ET)

  • Alberta - 7,138 cases, including 146 deaths (6,656 resolved)

  • British Columbia - 2,632 cases, 167 deaths (2,272 resolved)

  • Manitoba - 300 cases, 7 deaths (284 resolved)

  • New Brunswick - 136 cases, 1 death (121 resolved)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador - 261 cases, 3 deaths (256 resolved)

  • Northwest Territories - 5 cases (5 resolved)

  • Nova Scotia - 1,058 cases, 61 deaths (999 resolved)

  • Ontario - 30,202 cases, 2,407 deaths (23,947 resolved)

  • Prince Edward Island - 27 cases (27 resolved)

  • Quebec - 52,624 cases, 4,970 deaths (18,412 resolved)

  • Saskatchewan - 650 cases, 11 deaths (611 resolved)

  • Yukon - 11 cases (11 resolved)

  • Nunavut - 0 cases (1 false positive case)

  • CFB Trenton - 13 cases (13 resolved)

Authorities in Canada are working to contain the spread of COVID-19, which the World Health Organization deemed a pandemic in mid-March.

Canadians have contracted the disease while travelling in other countries from all over the world. Certain cases in Canada, which are linked to travel, have led to human-to-human transmission between close contacts, while community spread has been reported in the majority of Canada’s provinces.


In order to contain the spread, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has restricted Canada’s borders, provinces and territories have declared states of emergencies, while people returning back to Canada must self-isolate for 14 days upon return under the Quarantine Act.

Timeline of coronavirus cases in Canada from June 2020

June 6

Quebec reports some of its best stats since March

On Saturday, Quebec reported 226 new cases of COVID-19, marking the smallest increase to its total since March 21. 

It’s now the sixth straight day that it’s logged less than 300 new cases. Before the recent stretch, it hadn’t recorded less than 300 daily cases since March 25.

Of its 52,624 total cases, there are 18,412 people who have recovered from COVID-19, an increase of 648 since Friday’s update. Of the 29,242 active cases, there are now 981 people in hospital (down by 49); it’s the first time since April 15 that there have been less than a 1,000 patients in Quebec hospitals. Among its patients, there are now 129 in intensive care (down by two). 

On Saturday, the province also announced 35 fatalities, raising the death toll to 4,970. According to a press release, 22 of those deaths were recorded in its latest 24-hour stretch, while 13 occurred before May 30. 

The Montreal region remains the epicentre with 26,122 cases (up by 97) and 3,062 deaths (up by 15). 

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. For the eighth straight occasion, it failed to meet its goal of 14,000, after completing 10,789 tests for COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch.

Second migrant worker dies in Ontario

The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit has recorded the death of a second migrant worker who passed away due to COVID-19 complications.

The 24-year-old man died on Friday, according to Windsor Regional Hospital, who have contacted his family in Mexico. 

Before being admitted to hospital on June 1, the victim was self-isolating at a hotel. Over the last few weeks, workers who have not been able to safely self-isolate in bunkhouses provided by their employers have been moved to hotels, the health unit reported.

Through a press release, the hospital announced that starting Tuesday it will partner with various health organizations and local hospitals to conduct a “mass swabbing.” Together, they’ll test 8,000 migrant workers in the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit over the course of 10-14 days. 

Last weekend, a 31-year-old migrant worker in the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit passed away, marking a first in the province. He did not have any underlying health conditions, and arrived in Canada from Mexico in February. 

Migrant workers have been permitted to come to Canada amid the pandemic, but they must self-isolate for 14 days upon their arrival. In early April, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau allocated $50 million in federal funding to help employers of migrant workers as they adapt to the challenges of COVID-19 quarantine rules.

About 20,000 migrant workers come to Ontario each year to work in greenhouses and on farms, many from Mexico, the Caribbean and Guatemala. 

Hundreds of cases among migrant workers have been reported across Ontario at farms part of the Haldimand-Norfolk, Windsor-Essex, Niagara Region, Southwestern and Chatham-Kent public health units.

Migrant workers have complained about a lack of information and proper equipment to protect them from getting infected, according to the United Food and Commercial Workers union in Canada.

On Monday, Premier Doug Ford reported that 80 of Ontario’s 404 new daily cases involved migrant workers at farms in southwestern Ontario.

“I will definitely be addressing this with public health to make sure that we get all the migrant workers tested to keep them safe, to keep the supply chain and the food safe,” said Ford. “We're on this.”

Ford starts delivering on promise as Ontario continues to hit its testing goal

For the third straight day, the Ministry of Health has reported a record-high testing output, this time by completing 23,105 tests.

The province is above its goal of 16,000 tests in a day, and Saturday marks the closest it has come to reaching its max capacity of 25,000. 

Ontario’s seven-day testing average is now at its highest ever mark at 18,690 tests. It’s the start of a promise that Premier Doug Ford made in late May, after the province had come under fire for its testing outputs. 

"We’re going to ramp up the testing like this province has never seen. Another three, four weeks, we’re going to do a lot of testing, I can stand here and promise you that, I’m going to be all over this testing," said Ford on May 20, noting that he was “shocked” by Ontario’s outputs.

Over the past month and a half, the province has seen its testing outputs fluctuate. Between April 28-May 7, Ontario had a three-day stretch (May 1-3) where it hit its goal of 16,000 tests each time, but failed to meet that mark on the days before and after. Between May 8-17, the province went through a 10-day stretch where it hit its goal on seven different occasions. In the following 10-day stretch (May 18-27), it failed to meet it each time.

In an effort to increase testing, Ford said on May 25 that anyone who is concerned they may have COVID-19 won’t be refused a test at any of the province's assessment centres. On May 29, the province released a new testing plan, which includes "targeted campaigns" aimed at testing employees in key, high-risk sectors such as agri-food, auto and retail industries.

The province has now hit its goal (16,000) over eight of the last 10 days. Ford and health officials have said on multiple occasions that increased testing is crucial in understanding the scope of the virus’ impact on the province, and that without it they won’t be able to make follow-up decisions for how to further reopen the economy.

On Saturday, the province announced that it’s extending its emergency orders for another 10 days to June 19. The orders include banning people from gathering in groups larger than five, and from dining in bars and restaurants.

Along with the record-high testing, the province on Saturday announced 455 additional cases to its total of 30,202. 

Of those new patients, 68 were impacted by a laboratory-to-public health reporting delay, according to Ontario’s epidemiology summary. It’s not clear at this point which day those cases belong to. Of the 455 cases announced Saturday, 387 of them were discovered in the past 24 hours. 

The Greater Toronto Area continues to be the province’s epicentre; of the 455 cases announced Saturday, 386 of them were in the GTA. In total, since the start of the pandemic, 20,193 of the province’s 30,202 cases have been located in the area.

On Saturday, the Ministry of Health also recorded 35 more fatalities, increasing the death toll to 2,407.

Of its total case count, there are 23,947 people who have recovered from the virus, an increase of 364 since Friday. Of the 3,848 active cases that remain, there are 673 in hospital (down by 76), which includes 117 in intensive care (down by one) and 97 who require a ventilator (up by three). 

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 83 outbreaks in facilities across the province (down by two), where there are 923 active cases among residents (down by 46) and 685 among staff (down by 47). Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 1,717 residents (up by 25) and seven staff who have passed away after contracting COVID-19.

Alberta sees large spike in cases

Alberta reported 40 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, increasing its total to 7,138. 

The recent jump is significant compared to a day earlier, when seven cases were reported, which the chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw called “an occasion to be celebrated.”

The province was able to identify the new cases after completing 5,692 tests, according to Courtney Theriault of City News Edmonton.

Hinshaw did not hold a press conference Saturday to explain the jump in cases. 

No new fatalities were reported, as the death toll remains at 146. Of the province’s 7,138 cases, there are 6,656 who have recovered (up by 32 since Friday). Of its 336 active cases, 223 of them are located in the Calgary zone and 76 in the Edmonton zone. 

Across the province, there are 44 people in hospital (down by four), which includes six in intensive care.

Saskatchewan’s Far North reports a case for second day in a row

One new case of COVID-19 has been identified in the Far North, increasing the province’s total to 650.

No new recoveries were reported on Saturday, while there also remains 11 victims in the province. Of Saskatchewan’s 28 active cases, 18 of them are located in the Far North.

There is still currently one person who is in intensive care in the Saskatoon region, while there are 51 cases among health-care workers, but it’s unclear how many have recovered. 

Since the start of the outbreak, Saskatchewan has completed 51,181 tests for COVID-19.

June 5

Fewest daily cases in Alberta in almost three months

Alberta reported just seven cases in its latest 24-hour stretch, marking the smallest increase to its total since March 12.

Health officials were able to identify the cases after completing a record-high 6,455 tests in a day.

"Today's numbers mark an occasion to be celebrated," said Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the chief medical officer of health. "This is in large part thanks to your efforts and sacrifices."

Because of the continuing positive trends, Hinshaw said Albertans can expect an update on Saturday, which will allow for some hospital visits. People still won’t be allow to visit continuing care facilities, she said. 

Since May 14, Alberta has been in Stage 1 of its relaunch plan. Officials have said they’re ahead of track, and that they’re planning on moving  into their next phase earlier than expected because of the trends they’ve seen since easing restrictions for social gatherings and businesses. 

Of the province’s now 7,098 cases, there are 6,624 people who have recovered, which is an increase of 87 since Thursday. Of its 328 active cases, 238 of them are located in the Calgary zone. 

Across the province, there are 44 people in hospital (down by four), which includes six in intensive care.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials have completed 281,979 tests for COVID-19. Alberta’s first case was identified March 5.

British Columbia reports just one new of COVID-19

B.C. health officials announced one new case of COVID-19, but that they’ve also removed a case from yesterday due to a data correction, leaving its total count at 2,632.

The one new case is the fewest since the province reported no new daily cases in early March.

Among B.C.’s total cases are 2,272 who have recovered from the virus, up by seven since Thursday’s update. Of the 193 active cases that remain in the province, there are 21 who are in hospital (down by five) and five in intensive care (down by one).

One more person in the Fraser Health region has also passed away over the past 24 hours, increasing the death toll to 167. 

“There have been no new health-care facility outbreaks and the outbreak at the Berkley Care Centre has been declared over. In total, five long-term care or assisted-living facilities continue to have active outbreaks,” read a press release.

B.C.'s provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry did not hold a press conference on Friday.

Truckers continue to test positive in Manitoba

Manitoba announced two new cases of COVID-19, as it reached 300 cases throughout the pandemic. 

The latest patients involve a trucker who travelled outside the province, and one of his close household contacts. Both are men, one in his 20s and the other in his 30s, who live in the Winnipeg health region. 

Chief provincial public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin couldn’t say whether there were possibly other people exposed to the trucker. 

According to CBC, three of Manitoba’s last four cases in the Winnipeg region have been truck drivers. Two other truckers also tested positive for the respiratory virus last week. 

"They're doing everything correct: watching for symptoms very closely, getting tested as soon as any symptoms develop and limiting those contacts," said Roussin.

"We know [trucking is] necessary for the transportation of goods. We need that. And so we need to accept some level of risk for it, but from all of these indicators, things are being done right."

In May, health officials had to address an outbreak at a Brandon trucking company, Paul’s Hauling. The company said none of the infected patients were drivers, but 11 people connected to the workplace contracted the virus. 

Health officials and the Manitoba Trucking Association continue to work closely together. Truckers who leave the province regularly have been provided the option to get tested even if they aren’t showing symptoms at the end. 

Among the province’s 300 total cases, there are now 284 who have recovered. Since seven people have died, there are nine active patients throughout Manitoba. 

In its latest 24-hour stretch, 671 COVID-19 tests were completed, bringing the total number of tests to 47,372.

Ontario performs record-high COVID-19 testing

In its latest 24-hour stretch, the Ministry of Health completed its most ever tests with 22,730.

It’s the third straight day that Ontario has reached its goal of 16,000 and it’s the closest the province has come to hitting its maximum capacity of 25,000. 

Over the past few weeks, Premier Doug Ford has opened testing to anyone in the province, while "targeted campaigns" have investigated employees in key, high-risk sectors such as agri-food, auto and retail industries. The premier made the recent decisions after Ontario continuously failed to meet its testing goals. 

Among the 22,730 recent tests, the province identified 344 new cases, for a total of 29,747. Fifteen more fatalities were also reported, increasing the death toll to 2,372. 

There are now 23,583 people who have recovered from COVID-19 in Ontario, an increase of 375 since Thursday. Among its active cases, there are 749 in hospital (down by 27), which includes 118 in ICU (down by three), while there remains 94 on ventilators. 

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 85 outbreaks in facilities across the province (down by four), where there are 969 active cases among residents (down by one) and 732 among staff (down by 73). Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 1,692 residents (up by 13) and seven staff who have passed away after contracting COVID-19.

Almost all Quebec students in a class infected with COVID-19

A school in Quebec’s Trois-Rivières has experienced a COVID-19 outbreak, where almost all of its students in one classroom contracted the virus.

After two children at École Louis-de-France were diagnosed with the virus, health officials tested all children part of the class, identifying seven other cases. Since the reopening of Quebec schools has resulted in low attendance numbers, there were 11 or 12 students in the classroom, said a spokesperson for Mauricie-et-du-Centre-du-Québec’s regional health authority Julie Michaud.

Officials believe that one child originally contracted the virus in the community, then it spread to other students in the classroom.

École Louis-de-France has remained open, except for the classroom where the main outbreak occurred, which will stay closed until at least June 14 as it’s being disinfected and cleaned. Throughout the rest of the school, one other child and a staff member have tested positive. Among the 11 total patients, some didn’t show symptoms but they’re all in self-isolation as of June 2.

Michaud said to Yahoo Canada that preventative measures were put in place so children can maintain a two-metre distance. Proper hygiene practices were also regularly enforced.

When a case is identified at a school in Mauricie-et-du-Centre-du-Québec, the individual is sent home to self-isolate and contact tracing is performed. If they are multiple cases in a classroom, authorities close the space and everyone is tested.

Dr. Horacio Arruda, Quebec’s top doctor, has said multiple times over the course of the pandemic that kids aren’t at a high-risk to the virus compared to other age brackets, and that it’s normal to see some cases as the province reopens its school. 

Elementary schools around Quebec started to reopen May 11 (with the exception of those in the Montreal area), which was a first for a Canadian province. High schools, CEGEPs and post-secondary institutions around Quebec will also remain closed till the end of August. 

During its first three weeks of reopening, there have been 78 cases (44 students and 34 staff) among 72 school boards, according to Quebec’s ministry of education. 

The Mauricie region — where Trois-Rivières’ École Louis-de-France is located — had the most cases with 22.

In May, a school in Trois-Rivières, École Saint-Paul, had to close for several days after four teachers and two students tested positive. Arruda said that he believes some of the teachers had become infected before returning to schools.

The province saw 46 per cent of its students at public schools, and 51 per cent of its students at private schools, return to classrooms throughout the first week of reopening. There were about 200,000 students who were eligible to return, according to The Globe and Mail.

Quebec releases deaths from days prior, continues to stay below 300-case mark

On Friday, Quebec reported 50 new fatalities, increasing its death toll to 4,935.

In a press release, officials said that 33 of those deaths were recorded in the past 24 hours. The other 17 occurred before May 29. 

Along with the recent victims, the province announced 255 new cases of COVID-19, marking the fifth straight day that it’s logged less than 300 new cases. Before the recent stretch, it hadn’t recorded less than 300 daily cases since March 25.

The latest update increases its total case count to 52,398. 

There are also now 17,764 people who have recovered, an increase of 428 since Thursday. 

Among its now 29,699 active cases of COVID-19, there are 1,030 in hospital (down by 46) and 131 in intensive care (down by 15). 

The Montreal region remains the epicentre with 26,025 cases (up by 125) and 3,047 deaths (up by 31). 

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. In its most recent stretch, it failed to meet its goal of 14,000, after completing 12,490 tests for COVID-19.

Saskatchewan identifies another patient in Far North

One new case of COVID-19 has been identified in the Far North, increasing the province’s total to 649.

Among those cases are 611 people who have recovered, up by three since Thursday, while there remain 11 deaths. Of the 27 active cases, 17 of them are located in the Far North.

Throughout the province, there is one person who is in intensive care in the Saskatoon region. There remains 51 cases among health-care workers, but it’s unclear how many have recovered. 

Since the start of the outbreak, Saskatchewan has completed 50,597 tests.

June 4

New Brunswick records 1st death after COVID-19 enters LTC in connection to ‘irresponsible’ doctor

New Brunswick reported its first fatality, involving an individual in their 80s with underlying health conditions, who lived at the Manor de la Vallée long-term care facility.

Various news organizations have identified him as Daniel Ouellette, after a social media post by his family. He is part of a COVID-19 outbreak in the Campbellton region, which has infected 16 people. One new case was announced Thursday, involving an employee in their 20s at the LTC in Atholville, N.B.

New Brunswick previously had no active cases after all of its patients had recovered by May 16. But since May 21, they’ve discovered 16 new cases in the Campbellton region. Nine are linked to a long-term care facility (five residents and four staff), which includes a Quebec employee whose case is reflected in that province’s statistics. 

They’re all part of a cluster that officials believe was started by a family doctor, who exposed at least 150 people to the virus in the health-care and community setting. Instead of following a mandatory 14-day self-isolation period following his trip to Quebec in May to pick up his daughter, the doctor returned to work and saw patients during a two-week stretch at Campbellton Regional Hospital in the Restigouche area.

On May 28, a health-care worker at Manor de la Vallée was diagnosed with COVID-19, prompting all staff and residents to get tested. She was in contact with the family doctor on May 20, said Guy Tremblay, the president of Groupe Lokia, which owns the special care home for seniors.

Officials were able to link all of the initial patients after identifying the family doctor, whose case was announced on May 27. Premier Blaine Higgs called him an “irresponsible individual,” who was “not forthcoming” about the reasons for his trip upon returning to New Brunswick. The doctor has since been suspended as RCMP and Vitalité Health Network (a New Brunswick health authority) investigate to potentially lay charges.

In an interview with Radio-Canada’s La Matinale, the doctor said he’s not sure how he contracted the virus, saying he might have caught the virus from a patient on May 19. Throughout this overnight trip to Quebec, he said he made no stops to come into contact with anyone, while none of his family members were showing COVID-19 symptoms. He and his daughter have both since tested positive, after discovering that one of his patients had contracted the virus.

In New Brunswick, there are now four people in hospital, which includes one person in intensive care. About 300 close contacts of cases are currently in self-isolation.

Quebec continues to report deaths from weeks prior

On Thursday, Quebec reported 91 new fatalities, increasing its death toll to 4,885. 

In a press release, officials said that 26 of those deaths were recorded in the past 24 hours. The other 65 occurred before May 28. 

Along with the recent victims, the province announced 259 new cases of COVID-19, for a total of 52,143. 

There are also now 17,336 people who have recovered, an increase of 238 since Wednesday. 

Among its now 29,922 active cases of COVID-19, there are 1,076 in hospital (down by 65) and 146 in intensive care (down by 12). 

The Montreal region remains the epicentre with 25,900 cases (up by 112) and 3,016 deaths (up by 34). 

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. In its most recent stretch, it failed to meet its goal of 14,000, after completing 12,444 tests for COVID-19.

Ontario reports its most daily fatalities in over 3 weeks, completes record testing output

The Ministry of Health reported 45 more victims related to COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch, the most the province recorded since May 12.

The most recent update increased the province’s death toll to 2,357. Ontario also reported 356 new cases, after completing a record-high 20,822 tests in a single day. 

Of the province’s 29,403 total cases, there are 23,208 who have recovered from COVID-19, an increase of 397 since Wednesday.

Of the 3,838 active cases that remain, there are 776 in hospital (down by 15), which includes 121 in ICU (down by six) and 94 on ventilators (up by two). 

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 89 outbreaks in facilities across the province (down by 5), where there are 970 active cases among residents (down by 16) and 805 among staff (down by 61). Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 1,679 residents (up by 18) and seven staff who have passed away after contracting COVID-19.

On Thursday morning, the Ontario government announced that it appointed Dr. Jane Philpott as the special advisor to support the design and implementation of the new Ontario Health Data Platform. Philpott resigned as a cabinet minister in Justin Trudeau’s government in 2019 over the SNC scandal.

The data platform will provide health system partners and recognized researchers with access to anonymized health data that will allow them to better detect, plan, and respond to COVID-19.

According to a press release, these are the focusses that the new data system will have in its COVID-19 detection efforts;

  • Discovering risk factors for vulnerable populations;

  • Predicting when and where outbreaks may happen;

  • Evaluating how preventative and treatment measures are working; and

  • Identifying where to allocate equipment and other resources.

British Columbia reports four ‘epi-linked’ cases, breaks down data

B.C. health officials announced nine new cases of COVID-19, increasing its total to 2,632.

Five of the cases are active, but four are people who have already recovered. B.C.'s provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said they’re epidemiologically linked to previous patients who have tested positive, but they themselves were tested for a number of reasons. 

Among B.C.’s total cases are 2,265 who have recovered from the virus, up by 22 since Wednesday’s update. Of the 201 active cases that remain in the province, there are 26 who are in hospital (down by six) and six in intensive care (down by one).

No new fatalities were reported in the past 24 hours, while there remains six long-term care or assisted-living facilities that continue to have active outbreaks.

“There has been one new community outbreak with three confirmed cases at the Beresford Warming Centre, a shelter in the Fraser Health region. Public health teams are providing support at the site and for the other seven ongoing community outbreaks,” said a press release.

On Thursday, Henry presented genomic data that showed that most of the COVID-19 cases in B.C. are linked to Europe and Eastern Canada.

For the first time, the province also released more detailed geographic data about its COVID-19 cases, after breaking down its 16 health service delivery areas.

The Lower Mainland, Richmond has had the lowest percentage of cases, with just 444 per million residents. That’s compared to 1,241 cases per million in the area from Abbotsford to Hope in Fraser Health, 911 on the North Shore, and 832 in Vancouver.

Nova Scotia reports one more death outside of LTCs

One additional death has been reported in Nova Scotia, increasing the death toll to 61. 

The individual is a male in his 70s with underlying medical conditions in the province’s Central zone; he was not a resident of a long-term care home. 

No new cases were reported in Nova Scotia on Thursday, as its total remains at 1,058. That includes 995 people who have recovered, up by two since Wednesday. 

Of its active cases, there remain three people in hospital, which includes one in intensive care.

The Northwood long-term care in Halifax is the only facility with active cases; three residents and one staff member (down by one) are still COVID-19 positive.

Along with its positive cases, health officials have completed 43,911 negative tests since the start of the pandemic.

Saskatchewan falls below 30 active cases

One new case of COVID-19 has been identified in Saskatoon, increasing the province’s total to 648.

Among those cases are 608 people who have recovered, up by six since Wednesday, while there remain 11 deaths. Of the 29 active cases, 18 of them are located in the Far North.

Throughout the province, there are two people in hospital. Both are in intensive care in Saskatoon.

Since the start of the outbreak, Saskatchewan has completed 49,915 tests since the start of the outbreak.

Alberta adds to its COVID-19 death toll

The most recent death was a man in his 80s who was a resident of Extendicare Hillcrest, a nursing home in Calgary.

For the second-straight day, Alberta has recorded a COVID-19 fatality, this time involving a man in his 80s who was a resident of the  Extendicare Hillcrest nursing home in Calgary. 

It had previously gone five-straight days without an increase to its death toll. But the most recent victim increases it to 146. 

Fifteen new cases were also identified in the past 24 hours in Alberta, raising the total case count to 7,091.

Of those cases, there are 6,537 patients who have recovered, up by 74 since Wednesday. Of its 334 active cases, 247 are located in the Calgary zone.

Across the province, there remains 48 people in hospital, which includes six in intensive care.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials have completed 275,524 tests for COVID-19.

June 3

Quebec reports more recoveries than new cases, one patient linked to New Brunswick LTC

Quebec reported 81 new fatalities and 291 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, increasing its totals to 4,794 and 51,884, respectively. 

There are also now 17,098 people who have recovered, an increase of 295. 

Among its now 29,992 active cases of COVID-19, there are 1,141 in hospital (down by 34) and 158 in intensive care (down by three). 

The Montreal region remains the epicentre with 25,788 cases and 2,982 deaths. 

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs two days prior. In its most recent stretch, it failed to meet its goal of 14,000, after completing 9,646 tests for COVID-19. 

Among its latest cases includes a health-care worker, who’s employed at a New Brunswick long-term care facility, Manoir de la Vallée. The cluster of now 15 cases is believed to have been started after a family doctor didn’t self-isolate following a trip to Quebec himself. 

So far, five residents and three staff have tested positive at Manoir de la Vallée.

Two new cases part of New Brunswick’s recent cluster

Health officials in New Brunswick have identified two new cases of COVID-19 in Campbellton region, increasing its total active case count to 15.

One of them is an individual in their 40s and the other is in their 60s. According to a statement, health officials said one is close contact of a previously identified case in the outbreak, and the other is linked to Manoir de la Vallée, a long-term care facility in Atholville. 

A Quebec resident, who’s an employee at the LTC in Atholville, has also recently tested for COVID-19. Her case is reflected in Quebec’s statistics. 

New Brunswick previously had no active cases after all of its patients had recovered by May 16. But since May 21, they’ve discovered 15 new cases in the Campbellton region, and eight linked to a long-term care facility (five residents and three staff). 

They’re all part of a cluster that officials believe was started by a family doctor, who exposed at least 150 people to the virus in the health-care and community setting.

Instead of following a mandatory 14-day self-isolation period following his trip to Quebec in May, the doctor returned to work and saw patients during a two-week stretch at Campbellton Regional Hospital in the Restigouche area.

On May 28, a health-care worker at Manoir de la Vallée was diagnosed with COVID-19, prompting all staff and residents to get tested. She was in contact with the family doctor on May 20, said Dr. Guy Tremblay, the president of Groupe Lokia, which owns the special care home for seniors.

Alberta records its first death in almost a week

Two recent COVID-19 victims were announced Wednesday, after Alberta went five straight days without an increase to its death toll.

One was a woman in her 90s from Extendicare Hillcrest, and the other a woman in her 80s from Intercare Chinook Care Centre. 

The two long-term care victims increase the province’s death toll 145, which includes 111 residents in LTCs.

Nineteen new cases were also identified in the past 24 hours in Alberta, raising the total case count to 7,076.

Of those cases, there are 6,537 patients who have recovered, up by 50 since Tuesday. Of its 344 active cases, 255 are located in the Calgary zone.

Across the province, there are 48 people in hospital (down by three), which includes six in intensive care.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials have completed 266,301 tests for COVID-19. Alberta’s chief medical health officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw said they’ve seen an increase in people coming in for testing since they opened it to everyone.

Because of encouraging signs officials have seen in their case trends, the second phase of the province's relaunch could occur ahead of schedule, said Hinshaw. 

Ontario gets back on track with testing, below 400-case benchmark

The Ministry of Health reported 338 new cases of COVID-19, increasing Ontario’s total to 29,047.

It marks a slight decrease compared to the last two days, when the province recorded at least 400 cases. Before that two-day stretch, Ontario had stayed below the 400-case benchmark on six straight occasions.

The 338 new patients were identified after 17,537 tests were completed. Before Wednesday, the province had not hit its goal of 16,000 tests for two straight days.

Nineteen more people have died after contracting the respiratory virus since Tuesday’s report, increasing the death toll to 2,312.

Among the province’s total cases are 22,811 people who have recovered, an increase of 327 since Tuesday. Of its 3,924 active cases, there are 791 people in hospital (down by 10), which includes 127 in intensive care (up by two) and 92 people on ventilators (up by five).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 94 outbreaks in facilities across the province (down by 11), where there are 986 active cases among residents (down by 95) and 866 among staff (down by 59). Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 1,661 residents (up by nine) and seven staff who have passed away after contracting COVID-19.

Please see note at end of article with regards to Ontario's long-term care reporting structure compared to the Ministry of Health’s.

Nova Scotia identifies one new case

Health officials in Nova Scotia have identified a new case of COVID-19, increasing its total to 1,058.

Among its total cases are 993 people who have recovered from the virus. Of its active cases, there are three people in hospital, which includes one in intensive care.

The Northwood long-term care in Halifax is the only facility with active cases; three residents and two staff members are still COVID-19 positive.

Along with its positive cases, health officials have completed 43,340 negative tests since the start of the pandemic.

One new patient in Manitoba

A total of 298 individuals in Manitoba have contracted COVID-19, after health officials announced one new case Tuesday.

Dr. Brent Roussin, the province's chief public health officer, says the new case is linked to a cluster that now totals four temporary foreign workers in the southern health authority region.

Roussin wouldn’t identify the workplace, but mentioned that protocols regarding self-isolation were followed while there is little risk to the public.

Among Manitoba’s cases are 282 who have recovered from COVID-19, while the death toll remains at seven. It means there are now nine active cases in the province, with no one in hospital.

Since the start of the pandemic, Manitoba health officials have completed 45,923 tests for COVID-19.

New case in Saskatchewan’s Far North

One new case of COVID-19 has been identified in the Far North, increasing the province’s total to 647.

Among those cases are 602 people who have recovered and 11 deaths. Of the 34 active cases, 24 of them are located in the Far North.

Throughout the province, there are two people in hospital. Both are in intensive care in Saskatoon.

Saskatchewan has completed 49,132 tests since the start of the outbreak.

Twenty-two new cases, two outbreaks declared over in B.C.

B.C. health officials announced 22 new cases of COVID-19, increasing its total to 2,623.

Among those patients are 2,243 who have recovered from the virus, up by 14 since Tuesday’s update.

Of the 214 active cases that remain in the province, there are 32 who are in hospital (up by one) and seven in intensive care (down by one).

One more new fatality was reported in the past 24 hours in B.C.’s Fraser Health region, increasing the death toll to 166. 

In the past 24 hours, there have been no new health-care facility outbreaks and two outbreaks have now been declared over at Cottage-Worthington Pavilion and The Cedars in Mission, according to a press release. In total, six long-term care or assisted-living facilities continue to have active COVID-19 outbreaks.

June 2

Two new office outbreaks in B.C.

Two new community outbreaks within office environments have been declared at New World Technologies and at Maersk Distribution Canada Inc. Both workplaces have two cases and are in the Fraser Health region.

On Tuesday, B.C. health officials also reported four new cases of COVID-19, increasing the total to 2,601.

Among those patients are 2,229 who have recovered from the virus, up by 22 since Monday’s update.

Of the 207 active cases that remain in the province, there are 31 who are in hospital (down by one) and eight in intensive care (up by three).

No new fatalities were reported in the past 24 hours in B.C., and the death toll remains at 165.

In more positive news, there have also been no new health care outbreaks, while five outbreaks have now been declared over, including at Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer Centre, Amica Edgemont Village, Royal Arch Masonic Home, Chartwell Willow Retirement Community and the Eden Care Centre.

In total, eight long-term care or assisted-living facilities continue to have active outbreaks across B.C.

Alberta identifies 13 new cases of COVID-19

Thirteen new cases were identified in the past 24 hours in Alberta, raising the total case count to 7,057.

Of those cases, there are 6,537 patients who have recovered, up by 36 since Monday. Of its 377 active cases, 288 are located in the Calgary zone.

No new fatalities were reported in Alberta for the fifth-straight day, as the death toll remains at 143. 

Across the province, there are 51 people in hospital (down by two), which includes six in intensive care.

Since the start of the pandemic, health officials have completed 266,301 tests for COVID-19.

Two additional patients in Manitoba

A total of 297 individuals in Manitoba have contracted COVID-19, after health officials announced two new cases Tuesday.

Among the cases are 278 who have recovered from COVID-19, while the death toll remains at seven. It means there are now 12 active cases in the province, with no one in hosptial.

Since the start of the pandemic, Manitoba health officials have completed 45,099 tests for COVID-19.

Quebec death toll rises to 4,713

Quebec is preparing for its second wave of infections, as Premier Legault announced today that the province is seeking to hire 10,000 orderlies for its long-term care facilities.

A total of 51,593 infections have happened in Quebec, including 4,661 deaths due to COVID-19. There were 239 new infections announced on Tuesday, as well as 52 more deaths. 73.5 per cent of the deaths in the province are people who are over the age of 79. The rate of infection in long-term care facilities remains a key concern.

Legault said during a press conference on Tuesday that anyone interested in signing up to become an orderly can enrol in the three-month program, and will receive a starting salary of $49,000.

“This operation is crucial to prepare ourselves for a possible second wave,” he said.

New Brunswick reports one new case of COVID-19

There are now 133 cases of the virus in the province as of Tuesday. One new case was diagnosed since reporting took place on Monday; the individual is an octogenarian in the Campbellton region and is linked to the Manoir de la Vallée long-term care facility in Atholville.

All 13 active cases of COVID-19 are in the Campbellton region, and are linked to a family doctor who didn’t self-isolate following a trip to Quebec.

Ontario recoveries continue to increase

A total of 22,484 people have recovered from COVID-19 in Ontario, which according to Johns Hopkins University & Medicine, pushes the national total for recoveries past 50,000.

However Ontario still saw the total number of cases in the province reach 28,709 as 446 new cases were reported since Monday. On Monday evening, it was discovered that 700 positive cases in Ontario, in the Greater Toronto Area, went unreported to the correct public health region, as there was a mixup in which hospital was responsible for doing so. This means that thousands of contacts for these confirmed cases were not contacted by public health, potentially leading to the increase of COVID-19 cases in the area over recent weeks.

There have also been 17 more deaths, bringing the total number of fatalities in the province to 2,293.

June 1

One more death, outbreak declared over in B.C.

On Monday, health officials in B.C. provided an update for the last 48 hours, where they identified 24 new cases of COVID-19.

B.C. doesn’t provide a COVID-19 update on Sundays.

In its first 24-hour stretch, nine new patients were identified. In its second stretch leading up to Monday, another 15 patients were diagnosed with the respiratory virus.

In the past two days, one more person has died in the Fraser Health region, increasing the death toll to 165.

There are now 225 active cases in the province, since 2,207 (out of 2,597 total cases) have recovered from COVID-19.

In a press release, officials said “there have been no new health-care facility outbreaks and the outbreak at The Residence at Clayton Heights has been declared over. In total, 12 long-term care or assisted-living facilities and one acute-care unit have active outbreaks.”

No new deaths in Alberta, 10 cases linked to gatherings in Edmonton

Thirty-four new cases were identified in the past 24 hours in Alberta, raising the total case count to 7,044.

Of those cases, there are 6,501 patients who have recovered, up by 218 since Sunday.

No new fatalities were reported in Alberta for the fourth-straight day, as the death toll remains at 143. 

Across the province, there are 53 people in hospital (up by one), which includes six in intensive care.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, said there has been a recent increase in cases in the Edmonton zone, which is connected to two private family gatherings. At least 10 cases have been linked to the events, but testing and investigations are both ongoing.

Hinshaw said it’s not unexpected to have cases now linked to social gatherings, since the province has permitted outdoor gatherings of a maximum of 50 people and indoor gatherings of a maximum of 15 people. In all instances, people still must maintain a two-metre distance if they’re not from the same household.

Quebec’s new daily cases drop below Ontario daily totals

New numbers out of Quebec show 295 new coronavirus cases today and 20 additional deaths.

Those numbers are the smallest totals of new COVID-19 deaths since April 4, and the fewest new cases since March 25.

There are 1,185 people being treated for COVID-19 in Quebec hospitals as of Monday, down 13 from the 1,198 reported Sunday. Of those in a hospital, 163 are in intensive care, down eight from the 171 reported 24 hours earlier.

Quebec’s daily COVID-19 cases were lower than Ontario today, marking an improving trend for the province. Across Canada, it has the most total cases (51,354) and fatalities (4,661) out of any province or territory.

Ontario reports jump in cases, testing numbers drop again

Ontario reported 404 additional cases of COVID-19 on Monday, a 1.5 per cent jump in newly confirmed infections that marks a slight increase relative to daily growth rates seen over the last week.

It’s the first time over the past seven days that the province recorded more than 400 daily cases of COVID-19. The rise in cases is in part due to over 80 migrant workers who recently tested positive in southwestern Ontario, said Premier Doug Ford.

“I will definitely be addressing this with public health to make sure that we get all the migrant workers tested to keep them safe, to keep the supply chain and the food safe,” said Ford. “We're on this.”

Late Monday, it was announced that a temporary foreign worker from Mexico, passed away after contracting COVID-19. The 31-year-old had no underlying health issues, said Dr. Wajid Ahmed, the medical officer of health for the WIndsor Essex County Health Unit.

The man worked at Woodside Greenhouses Inc., the pepper farm in Kingsville, Ont., and has been identified as Bonifacio Eugenio-Romero.

Drop in testing

The 404 new patients come as the number of tests processed dropped below the province's target of 16,000, after four straight days of surpassing the benchmark. Ontario's network of labs processed 14,379 samples on Sunday. It has the capacity to complete up to 25,000 in a day, according to the Ministry of Health.

There were also 10 more fatalities related to COVID-19 in the province, marking the fewest daily deaths recorded since April 1. The update increased Ontario’s death toll to 2,276.

Saskatchewan reports one new case

A new patient has been identified in the Regina area, but the province’s total remains at 646. One previous case has turned out negative after a second sample was taken, according to a press release by officials.

Six more people have recovered from the respiratory virus since Sunday, increasing the total of resolved cases to 588. Of the 47 active patients, there are four in hospital, including two in intensive care.

There remains 50 health-care workers who have been infected, but the source of infection for each case may not be related to their line of work, according to a press release. It’s unclear how many have recovered.

To date, 48,272 COVID-19 tests have been performed in the province.

Nova Scotia reports one new case

Health officials in Nova Scotia have identified a new case of COVID-19, increasing its total to 1,057.

Among its total cases are 984 people who have recovered from the virus. Of its active cases, there are six people in hospital, which includes two in intensive care.

“There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 10 residents and four staff active cases,” said a press release.

Along with its positive cases, health officials have completed 42,426 negative tests since the start of the pandemic.

For a timeline of cases throughout April, 2020, please check our roundup here.

Note about Ontario’s reporting: The Ministry of Health’s statistics are current as of 4:00 p.m., the day before they are released, and are compiled through the province’s Integrated Public Health Information System (iPHIS), which is reliant on local public health units inputting statistics. The system has faced scrutiny for under-reporting Ontario’s numbers; their statistics on LTCs also differ from the Ministry of Long-Term Care.

The Ministry of Long-Term Care’s statistics, released at 10:30 a.m., are current as of 3:30 p.m. the evening before. Their statistics are compiled through immediate contact with long-term care facilities across the province.

The iPHIS also reports statistics among the province’s long-term care facilities, but it includes “all outbreak-related cases and deaths reported in aggregate outbreak summary counts, regardless of whether the case was laboratory confirmed.”