Expert: Why Melania Trump is rarely seen without her sunglasses

AOL.com Editors

If there's one wardrobe item so signature to Melania Trump's style, it's sunglasses.

In fact, the first lady is rarely seen without a pair on and frequently opts for the accessory for any type of occasion, from trips aboard Air Force One to nighttime engagements to official state memorial services. A recent appearance at the 75th D-Day commemoration in Normandy, France, was even heavily criticized for her decision to keep her sunglasses on, a move that was slammed as "disrespectful" and "rude" given the somber occasion. 

However, some believe that her decision to wear her sunglasses is merely a way for the first lady to protect herself from public scrutiny and criticism.

"She tends to wear sunglasses and hats to shield herself from the public eye. As she's stated in previous interviews, she often feels as though she is being bullied," explained fashion psychologist Dawnn Karen to Mirror Online.

In addition to sunglasses, hats are another way the first lady uses her style as a shield to block herself from the public, maintained Karen. 

“I believe that the hat serves as armour of some sort. When she's looking out into the audience, she cannot see the entire crowd due to her sunglasses or her hat," the expert continued. 

See more of her most controversial outfits:

The 49-year-old first lady has become known for her elaborate and statement-making sartorial choices, from wide-brimmed hats, pussy-bow blouses, colonial-era hats and, most notably, the controversial jacket she wore for a visit at the border which was emblazoned with the words "I really don't care, do you?" 

Trump's hat-wear of choice during her solo tour of Africa last fall remains one of her most controversial to date: the white pith helmet she wore to a Nairobi national park may have been a fashion statement or a protective choice, but its divisive colonial history garnered much criticism.

"I want to talk about my trip and not what I wear. That’s very important, what I do, what we’re doing with USAID, my initiatives, and I wish people would focus on what I do, not what I wear,” she said in response to the harsh judgment surrounding her fashion choices

Related: See the first lady's fashion in Africa