Myrtle grown from the late Queen’s wedding bouquet included in her funeral wreath

·3 min read
queen wreath - AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti,Pool
queen wreath - AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti,Pool

Myrtle used in Queen Elizabeth's funeral wreath was grown from a sprig in her wedding bouquet in 1947.

The late Queen’s coffin will be adorned with a wreath of flowers and foliage that includes myrtle, a symbol of her happy and long marriage to the Duke of Edinburgh.

The couple had been married for 73 years until the death of Prince Philip in April last year. They will be reunited when Queen Elizabeth is interred in St George’s Chapel in Windsor at the end of a hugely emotional day.

Details of the wreath were released by Buckingham Palace prior to the funeral at Westminster Abbey.

Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin will be draped with the Royal Standard, upon which will be placed the Imperial State Crown and Regalia along with the wreath of flowers.

The flowers and foliage were cut from the gardens of Buckingham Palace, Clarence House and Highgrove House at the request of the new King.

queen duke of edinburgh - PA Wire
queen duke of edinburgh - PA Wire

The foliage, including the myrtle, was chosen for its symbolism. The myrtle was picked as an “ancient symbol” of a happy marriage, according to Buckingham Palace. It was cut from a plant that was grown from a sprig of myrtle in Her late Majesty’s wedding bouquet in 1947.

The wreath will also contain rosemary signifying remembrance and English oak, which, said the Palace, symbolises the strength of love.

Also included in the wreath are scented pelargoniums, garden roses, autumnal hydrangea, sedum, dahlias, and scabious. The flowers have been picked in shades of gold, pink and deep burgundy, with touches of white, to reflect the Royal Standard, on which it sits.

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II is placed on a gun carriage during her funeral service - Emilio Morenatti/Pool AP
The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II is placed on a gun carriage during her funeral service - Emilio Morenatti/Pool AP

At the King’s request, the wreath is environmentally friendly, made in a totally sustainable way, in a nest of English moss and oak branches. No floral foam was used in its making.

A carpet of flowers will greet mourners arriving at St George’s Chapel for the Queen’s committal service.

The Royal family will bid farewell to their beloved matriarch in the gothic chapel on the grounds of Windsor Castle in a service attended by around 800 people.

People line the route of Queen Elizabeth's funeral procession on the Long Walk at Windsor Castle - WPA Pool/Getty Images Europe
People line the route of Queen Elizabeth's funeral procession on the Long Walk at Windsor Castle - WPA Pool/Getty Images Europe

Members of the congregation are expected to include the late monarch’s nearest and dearest, her household staff past and present, and foreign royal families.

A wreath from Number 10, signed by Liz Truss, the Prime Minister, sits close to the door of the chapel, and says: “For a lifetime of devotion and duty we offer our deep and sincere gratitude.”

Flowers of all kinds cover the area around the chapel, from bouquets of red roses to pink lilies to potted plants to wreaths from foreign royals.

Inside one of the main entrances to the chapel, a floral arrangement of white blossoms sits in full bloom.

Among the flowers in the chapel were lilies, dahlias, roses, and greenery including Eucalyptus and other greenery picked from Home Park.