Harry and Meghan's wedding cake maker shares recipe for unusual meal that makes her happy

Rebecca Taylor
·Royal Correspondent
·3 min read
Owner of Violet Bakery in Hackney, east London, Claire Ptak poses for a portrait with a tier of the wedding cake of Britain's Prince Harry and US actress Meghan Markle in the kitchens of Buckingham Palace in London, on May 17, 2018. - Britain's Prince Harry and US actress Meghan Markle will marry on May 19 at St George's Chapel in Windsor Castle. (Photo by HANNAH MCKAY / POOL / AFP)        (Photo credit should read HANNAH MCKAY/AFP via Getty Images)
Owner of Violet Bakery in Hackney, east London, Claire Ptak with a tier of the wedding cake of Harry and Meghan. (Hannah McKay/AFP)

The baker behind Harry and Meghan's wedding cake has shared the unusual recipe for her favourite food, which brings her happiness.

Claire Ptak, who runs a bakery in East London, made a lemon and elderflower creation for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on their wedding day in May 2018.

But sharing a recipe alongside other top chefs in The Times, Ptak revealed that her ultimate comfort food is actually savoury not sweet - a spaghetti cake.

Ptak explained that the dish was similar to a Spanish omelette, but instead of potato, uses spaghetti.

She said: "When you make spaghetti for dinner make sure to make too much (don’t you always?), then chill it overnight. The next day whisk up some eggs, add salt and pepper and grated parmesan and mix in a bowl.

"Toss in the leftover spaghetti and fry in some oil in a non-stick pan much like when you make a Spanish tortilla. Slide it on to a plate once set and flip it over on to its other side and cook until nice and golden. Cut into wedges and serve."

She said the savoury nature of the dish, despite the name cake, was "maybe part of its appeal".

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LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 20:  Claire Ptak, owner of Violet Bakery in Hackney, east London poses on March 20, 2018 in London, England. Claire Ptak has been chosen to make the cake for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. The royal couple have asked Ms Ptak to create a lemon elderflower cake to incorporate the bright flavours of spring. It will be covered with buttercream and decorated with fresh flowers. (Photo by Victoria Jones - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Claire Ptak, in Violet Bakery. The baker shared her happy food - which is a savoury dish. (Victoria Jones - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

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Ptak used some 200 Amalfi lemons to make the huge cake for Harry and Meghan for their wedding day.

Her cafe is currently open for takeaways and prices for her cakes made to order start at £40. Lemon and elderflower cake is one of the options she still provides, giving customers a chance to share in the royal wedding day.

Another chef who worked on Harry and Meghan's wedding recently made history by becoming the first female chef to win three Michelin stars at her own restaurant.

Clare Smyth was chosen by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex for their Frogmore House reception. She also appeared with the duchess at a later date as she worked with the survivors of the Grenfell fire on a charity cookbook.

Britain’s Prince Harry gestures next to his wife Meghan as they ride a horse-drawn carriage after their wedding ceremony at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle in Windsor, Britain, May 19, 2018. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj     TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Harry and Meghan on their wedding day on 19 May 2018. (Reuters/Damir Sagolj)

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Smyth opened Core by Clare Smyth in London’s Notting Hill in 2017 and won two stars as a new entry to the Michelin guide in 2019.

The Northern Irish chef also received the World’s Best Female Chef Award from the World’s 50 Best Restaurants.

Meghan's love of food was well-documented on her website, The Tig, which she closed down when she became a senior royal.

She has used food connections to decide some of her post-royal work too, donating £10,000 to a charity in Nottingham, which provides food to those in poverty and facing homelessness.