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Javelina tries to bust into home, then emerges stuck in dog door frame, video shows

A javelina tried to bust through a pet door at an Arizona home, but it didn’t get very far.

The pig-like animal backed out with the dog door frame stuck around its body.

The creature attempted to sneak into the Tucson home in October, the Arizona Game and Fish Department said in a Nov. 27 Facebook post.

A video caught the wild animal dipping its toes in water in what appears to be someone’s yard on Oct. 17. The frame was still squeezed around its body.

It’s not clear if the video was taken on someone’s trail camera or security camera, the Tucson wildlife department spokesperson Mark Hart told McClatchy News by email Nov. 27.

However, the javelina was eventually captured and freed from the frame, then released back into the wild, officials said.

In October, a javelina tried to sneak into a Tucson, Arizona, home through the dog door, but got its body stuck in the frame, wildlife officials said. Arizona Game and Fish Department
In October, a javelina tried to sneak into a Tucson, Arizona, home through the dog door, but got its body stuck in the frame, wildlife officials said. Arizona Game and Fish Department

That wasn’t the first time a javelina tried to get into someone’s home, officials said.

Another javelina broke into a different home Sunday, Nov. 26 in Tucson and damaged furniture before it was “coaxed out,” wildlife officials said.

Wildlife officials said both incidents were likely a result of the javelinas smelling food inside the homes.

“Dog doors should be kept locked at night or when residents are not home, especially in outlying areas where wildlife is present,” officials said in the post.

What’s a javelina?

At first glance, a javelina appears to look like a pig or wild boar, but the animal belongs to the peccary family “a group of hoofed mammals originating from South America,” according to the Arizona Game and Fish Department.

Javelinas weigh about 40 to 60 pounds and have salt and pepper coloring when they become adults, wildlife officials said.

The animal’s pig-like nose gives it a “great sense of smell,” but they have poor eyesight, according to Arizona State Parks and Trails.

Their poor eyesight may make them appear to be charging when they are just trying to escape, wildlife officials said.

In addition to living in Arizona, these “hoofed raiders of the night” are also found in Texas, New Mexico, Mexico and Argentina.

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