Melania Trump helps pardon a Thanksgiving turkey wearing a coat Twitter thinks is 'ridiculous'

Elise Solé
First Lady Melania Trump helped pardon a turkey as part of an annual Thanksgiving tradition. (Photo: Getty Images)

Melania Trump helped pardon a pair of Thanksgiving turkeys wearing a poultry-inspired coat that some on Twitter trashed as “ridiculous,” “hideous” and a cry for help.

To witness Tuesday’s annual turkey pardoning ceremony — a 155-year tradition that began during Abraham Lincoln’s presidency — Melania wore a Dior color-block coat in brown, orange, black and white with a pair of tall, black stiletto boots.

During the Rose Garden ceremony, President Trump officially pardoned two birds from South Dakota named Peas and Carrots. “That turkey is so lucky. I’ve never seen such a beautiful turkey,” he said.

Melania Trump, pictured with President Trump and their son, Barron, wore a controversial coat to the White House turkey pardon ceremony. (Photo: Getty Images)

A White House poll voted to spare the life of Peas in what President Trump called a “fair and open election” however both birds were ultimately granted their freedom. “Unfortunately, Carrots refused to concede and demanded a recount, and we’re still fighting with Carrots,” he joked. “I will tell you we’ve come to a conclusion. Carrots, I’m sorry to tell you the result did not change.”

The birds prepped for the ceremony with a “spa day” at the Willard Intercontinental Hotel and joined reporters in the press briefing room. “Even though Peas and Carrots have received a presidential pardon, I have warned them that House Democrats are likely to issue them both subpoenas,” said the president. 

But the lucky turkeys lost control of the room when attention was diverted to the first lady’s coat.





A few believed the coat was a subliminal message from Melania to escape her role as the first lady, in the spirit of #FreeMelania.




And someone said the coat’s geometric pattern was a rip-off of a dress worn by Michelle Obama in a famous painting that hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. 


The coat did receive some compliments — Twitter users also called the look stunning and beautiful.

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