'No Sudden Move', 'The Lighthouse', 'The Last Black Man in San Francisco': The movies to stream this weekend

·4 min read
No Sudden Move, The Lighthouse, and The Last Black Man in San Francisco are all new to streaming this weekend (Warner Bros./Universal/A24)
No Sudden Move, The Lighthouse, and The Last Black Man in San Francisco are all new to streaming this weekend (Warner Bros./Universal/A24)

Yahoo Entertainment's editors are committed to independently selecting wonderful products at great prices for you. We may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Pricing and availability are subject to change.

A couple of acclaimed features from the internet's favourite indie label A24 land on Netflix this weekend, with Robert Eggers’ The Lighthouse and Joe Talbot’s The Last Black Man in San Francisco dropping a day apart. 

On the new releases front, No Sudden Move, the latest from America’s busiest director Steven Soderbergh comes to NOW.

Please note that a subscription may be required to watch.

No Sudden Move - NOW with a Sky Cinema Membership from 9 October

Don Cheadle stars alongside Benicio Del Toro in crime thriller 'No Sudden Move;. (Warner Bros)
Don Cheadle stars alongside Benicio Del Toro in crime thriller 'No Sudden Move;. (Warner Bros)

After being a highlight in Out of Sight, one of Steven Soderbergh's best early works, Don Cheadle reunites with the filmmaker as Curtis Goynes, the put-upon protagonist of No Sudden Move. It recalls both that film’s quick-witted charm and matches it with the thoughtful and enraged reflections on capitalism of Soderbergh’s late career work. 

Where Unsane considers the broken American health care system and High Flying Bird goes deep on labour abuses in sports, No Sudden Move contrasts its low-level crooks with high-level corporate conmen in the auto industry, slowly morphing into a surprisingly bleak piece about their cynical games. 

Watch: The cast of No Sudden Move talk to Yahoo about the film

It’s as reminiscent of the bleaker works of the Coen brothers as much as it is an Easy Rawlins novel; its star-studded cast disguising a much more sinister movie than expected. It’s a shame that its being released with so little fanfare in the UK, because it’s a fine example of how one of America’s busiest filmmakers has managed to keep his spark.

Also new on NOW: Judas and the Black Messiah, Voyagers

The Lighthouse - Netflix

From <em>The Witch</em> director Robert Eggers comes this film, in which Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe are locked in a lighthouse and allowed to go slowly insane. (Credit: Universal)
From The Witch director Robert Eggers comes this film, in which Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe are locked in a lighthouse and allowed to go slowly insane. (Credit: Universal)

Following on from his 1630s New England folk horror The Witch, The Lighthouse finds Robert Eggers mining the same area for more isolated despair, only this time from the perspective of two washed up lighthouse keepers in the 1890s as they try to maintain their sanity while living on a remote island. 

A chamber piece anchored by two delirious, captivating performances from Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson, Eggers uses their volatile chemistry to tell a story that feels mythic despite its containment to that lonely island. It emulates the orthochromatic photography of the 19th century as the film captures their madness as well as the simple gross details of living in a confined space with a washed-up sailor. It’s astonishing to look at, not to mention frequently hilarious.

The Last Black Man in San Francisco - Netflix from 9 October

The Last Black Man in San Francisco (Credit: A24)
The Last Black Man in San Francisco (Credit: A24)

A film that made a striking breakout role for Jonathan Majors, Joe Talbot’s The Last Black Man in San Francisco taps into a long history of displacement and ownership for an intimate tale of two men navigating a rapidly changing city. Jimmie (Jimmie Fails) fantasises about reclaiming the home his grandfather built in the heart of San Francisco, which was lost by his estranged father over a decade past. He and his best friend Mont (Majors) try and figure out a way to get the house, and Talbot follows them throughout their meanderings and their romanticising of the house. There’s a charming odd-couple dynamic between Jimmie and Mont, the former an outgoing skater and the latter a more diminuitive, observational type - watching and sketching the people around him while working on a play about the town.

Watch a trailer for The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Before similarly lush work on Minari, another tale of people trying to make a home in America, Emile Mosseri’s swooning soundtrack makes for a hypnotic blend with Adam Newport-Berra handsome, sun-soaked camerawork. It’s a melancholic film, celebrating and mourning a changing city, paying particular attention to the personal histories that have been paved over.

Also new on Netflix: Pokemon the Movie: Secrets of the Jungle

Also new on Disney+: Hidden Figures, Logan, The Omen

Also new on Amazon Prime Video: Justin Bieber: Our World, Welcome to the Blumhouse: Madres/The Manor, Joker, Wild Mountain Thyme

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting