Queen Camilla Is Fulfilling Her Royal Duties and Grieving Queen Elizabeth — All with a Broken Toe

·3 min read
Queen Camilla Is Fulfilling Her Royal Duties and Grieving Queen Elizabeth — All with a Broken Toe

Queen Camilla is putting her best foot forward — despite nursing a broken toe — during a busy and emotional period following the death of Queen Elizabeth II.

Camilla, 75, reportedly sustained the injury before the monarch died on September 8 at Balmoral Castle in Scotland, making her husband the King. A day later, the new monarch officially named his wife, formerly the Duchess of Cornwall, his Queen Consort.

Since then, it's been a whirlwind of travel and officially duties for the couple as King Charles begins his reign and mourns his mother.

Camilla has been in "quite a lot of pain," according to The Telegraph, which quotes a source who said she is "getting on" and has been "an absolute trouper."

RELATED: Queen Camilla Tells Well-Wishers 'We're Doing Our Best' After Queen Elizabeth's Death

King Charles III and Camilla, Queen Consort attend a Service of Prayer and Reflection for the Life of The Queen at Llandaff Cathedral
King Charles III and Camilla, Queen Consort attend a Service of Prayer and Reflection for the Life of The Queen at Llandaff Cathedral

Frank Augstein - Pool/Getty Images

Back in London, Charles, 73, and Camilla sat for the first time on thrones as king and queen consort during a meeting with 900 members of the legislative body and members of the House of Lords, who offered their condolences at Westminster Hall on September 9.

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A day later, King Charles and Queen Camilla held their first audiences with the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Prime Minister and Members of the Cabinet, and Opposition Party Leaders, Buckingham Palace said in a statement September 10.

Camilla Queen Consort arrives at Cardiff Castle
Camilla Queen Consort arrives at Cardiff Castle

Chris Jackson/WPA Pool/Shutterstock

In between ceremonies to honor and mourn Queen Elizabeth and her historic 70-year reign, the new King and Queen have been on a four-nation tour of the United Kingdom, with stops in Scotland, England, Ireland and, on Friday, Wales, a country of particular significance to Charles, who spent most of his life as the Prince of Wales before his son William inherited the title.

King Charles and Queen Camilla attended a service of prayer and reflection for the life of the Queen at Llandaff Cathedral in the Welsh capital city of Cardiff on Friday. They later received a Motion of Condolence at the Senedd, while the King is set to conduct audiences at Cardiff Castle and attend a reception for local charities with Camilla.

RELATED: Queen Camilla ​​Wears Brooch Gifted to Her by Queen Elizabeth During Cathedral Service

"We are doing our best," Camilla told a well-wisher Tuesday outside of Hillsborough Castle in Belfast, where she and the king viewed the flowers, notes and other tributes left in honor of the late Queen.

King Charles III and Camilla, Queen Consort depart following a Service of Prayer and Reflection for the Life of The Queen at Llandaff Cathedral
King Charles III and Camilla, Queen Consort depart following a Service of Prayer and Reflection for the Life of The Queen at Llandaff Cathedral

Matthew Horwood/Getty Images King Charles and Queen Camilla

"I count on the loving help of my darling wife, Camilla," King Charles said in his first address to the nation following the death of his mother. "In recognition of her own loyal public service since our marriage 17 years ago, she becomes my Queen Consort. I know she will bring to the demands of her new role the steadfast devotion to duty on which I have come to rely so much."

As hundreds of heads of state, royals and other political luminaries gather in London ahead of Monday's state funeral for Queen Elizabeth, Charles and Camilla will be meeting with many of the world's leaders and other dignitaries for the first time as King and Queen Consort.

A London government source likened to packing "hundreds of state visits" into just a few days, according to The Times.