• Tony-nominated Broadway star Nick Cordero dies at 41 after protracted battle with COVID-19
    Celebrity
    Yahoo Music

    Tony-nominated Broadway star Nick Cordero dies at 41 after protracted battle with COVID-19

    Cordero's wife, Amanda Kloots, had documented his rocky progress with emotional daily updates on Instagram and the campaign #wakeupnick.

  • Ivanka Trump’s ‘Gaslighting’ Fourth of July Coronavirus Advice Backfires
    News
    HuffPost

    Ivanka Trump’s ‘Gaslighting’ Fourth of July Coronavirus Advice Backfires

    "The absolute and total lack of shame is breathtaking. Just an utter inability to hear herself," one Twitter user responded.

  • Coco Austin Says Family Is 'Falling Apart' as Dad Battles COVID-19: 'Too Early for Him to Go'
    Celebrity
    People

    Coco Austin Says Family Is 'Falling Apart' as Dad Battles COVID-19: 'Too Early for Him to Go'

    "For all the people that say it can't happen to your family, think again," the actress wrote on Instagram

  • From 'Hamilton' to 'Tiger King,' here are the 25 best things we've streamed in 2020 (so far)
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies

    From 'Hamilton' to 'Tiger King,' here are the 25 best things we've streamed in 2020 (so far)

    No movie theaters, no problem. Here's the best streaming content — movies, series, documentaries and more — from the first half of the year that you can watch from the comfort of your couch.

  • Hillary Clinton Uses Barbra Streisand’s Pandemic Question To Taunt Donald Trump
    Politics
    HuffPost

    Hillary Clinton Uses Barbra Streisand’s Pandemic Question To Taunt Donald Trump

    Music icon Streisand asked how Clinton would have tackled coronavirus had she been president. Trump won't like Clinton's answer.

  • People Are Peeing And Pooping All Over The Queen’s Balmoral Estate Because Of Lockdown
    News
    HuffPost

    People Are Peeing And Pooping All Over The Queen’s Balmoral Estate Because Of Lockdown

    Visitors are being urged to stop urinating and defecating "right next to busy paths or monuments."

  • Chris Cuomo tells Fla. Gov. DeSantis to shush after he railed against the media for coronavirus coverage
    Politics
    Yahoo Entertainment

    Chris Cuomo tells Fla. Gov. DeSantis to shush after he railed against the media for coronavirus coverage

    Cuomo slammed Gov. DeSantis for prematurely opening Florida to please Trump and railing against the media for questioning him.

  • 'Time traveler' mystifies social media users with eerily accurate predictions: 'This is freaking me out'
    Lifestyle
    In The Know

    'Time traveler' mystifies social media users with eerily accurate predictions: 'This is freaking me out'

    A Twitter user named Drew Curtis made a bold prediction back in 2015 — and now it looks like he might’ve been right all along.

  • These Are The Most Common Symptoms Of COVID-19 Right Now
    Health
    HuffPost Life

    These Are The Most Common Symptoms Of COVID-19 Right Now

    The CDC updated its official coronavirus symptom list. Curious to know what you should be concerned about? Here's a quick guide.

  • 'Tenet,' 'Black Widow,' 'The Batman,' 'Jungle Cruise,' 'Wonder Woman 1984' and 'Indiana Jones 5': All the major blockbuster movies that have been delayed due to the coronavirus
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies

    'Tenet,' 'Black Widow,' 'The Batman,' 'Jungle Cruise,' 'Wonder Woman 1984' and 'Indiana Jones 5': All the major blockbuster movies that have been delayed due to the coronavirus

    The coronavirus has wrecked havoc on Hollywood’s release schedule, as multiple blockbusters-to-be have had their release dates postponed by as much as a year or canceled indefinitely. We're tracking the latest news on when you’ll be able to see major movies at a theater — or, in some cases, a streaming service — near you.

  • Disney's Splash Mountain, criticized for racist roots, getting 'Princess and the Frog' makeover
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies

    Disney's Splash Mountain, criticized for racist roots, getting 'Princess and the Frog' makeover

    Disney’s Splash Mountain will be getting a much-needed makeover after criticism of its racist roots.

  • Corona Is One Of 2020's Top 100 Baby Names Because Of Course
    Lifestyle
    HuffPost Canada

    Corona Is One Of 2020's Top 100 Baby Names Because Of Course

    Other inspirations include a princess, a Canadian actor and the great outdoors.

  • Philadelphia couple becomes a symbol of hope and love during Black Lives Matter protest
    Celebrity
    Yahoo Life

    Philadelphia couple becomes a symbol of hope and love during Black Lives Matter protest

    Newlyweds Dr. Kerry Anne Gordon, 35 and Michael Gordon, 42, share their "first look" on their wedding day with dozens of people demonstrating during a Black Lives Matter protest.

  • More young people are contracting COVID-19, but why?
    Health
    Yahoo Life

    More young people are contracting COVID-19, but why?

    "COVID-19 doesn't care what you look like, where you live, or how old you are,” one expert tells Yahoo Life. “It wants to infect you.”

  • ‘The Bold and the Beautiful’ Will Use Blow-Up Dolls for Sex Scenes
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    ‘The Bold and the Beautiful’ Will Use Blow-Up Dolls for Sex Scenes

    “The Bold and the Beautiful” has found a creative way to film its intimate sex scenes in the social distancing era: Using blow-up dolls.“We have some life-like blow up dolls that have been sitting around here for the past 15 years, that we’ve used for various other stories — (like) when people were presumed dead,” Bradley Bell, executive producer and head writer, told Forbes. “We’re dusting off the dolls and putting new wigs and make-up on them and they’ll be featured in love scenes.”Bell added that for intimate scenes that also involve touching (and a live body that can move), they will use actors’ spouses, provided they test negative for COVID-19.Also Read: 'The Bold and the Beautiful' to Become First U.S. Series to Return to Production Following COVID-19The CBS soap opera returned to its Television City soundstage on Wednesday, becoming the first U.S. television series to get back to work following the three-month shutdown amid the coronavirus pandemic. Last month, the series was renewed for two more seasons, which will take it through Season 35 and 2022. The hope is for new original episodes to begin airing in early-to-mid July, though no airdate has been set yet.The cast and crew will be tested for coronavirus daily as part of the health protocol. “The Bold and the Beautiful” has also hired a COVID-19 director who will be on set at all times to make sure proper protocols are followed as set forth by L.A. County, the City of Los Angeles, and each of the Hollywood guilds. The series will also be allowing fewer cast and crew on set per day than before, or they will be asked to come in shifts. All will be required to social distance themselves and wear face masks at all times, with an exception made for actors who are filming a scene.Read original story ‘The Bold and the Beautiful’ Will Use Blow-Up Dolls for Sex Scenes At TheWrap

  • Queen's reign is 'effectively over' because of coronavirus, says royal biographer
    Celebrity
    Yahoo News UK

    Queen's reign is 'effectively over' because of coronavirus, says royal biographer

    Andrew Morton says the pandemic has effectively put Charles on the throne.

  • Up to 40% of coronavirus cases are spread by people without symptoms, WHO warns
    Health
    Yahoo News UK

    Up to 40% of coronavirus cases are spread by people without symptoms, WHO warns

    Maria van Kerkhove, the WHO's technical lead, said anywhere between 6% and 41% of the world's population may have had the virus without symptoms.

  • CDC says pets not a major factor in COVID-19 spread — here’s what you need to know
    Health
    Yahoo Life

    CDC says pets not a major factor in COVID-19 spread — here’s what you need to know

    The CDC has released an expanded report on the two New York cats who tested positive for COVID-19. From designating a healthy person to care for your pet to limiting interactions, here's what you need to know about staying safe.

  • A healthcare worker got COVID-19 and survived — then lost her partner of 40 years to the illness
    News
    CBC

    A healthcare worker got COVID-19 and survived — then lost her partner of 40 years to the illness

    Felicidad Maloles walks through her front garden, stopping in front of a lush peony bush.She snips three big, pink blooms — vibrant and full of life.Maloles' husband of 40 years, Danilo Torres, planted the bush years earlier, she says. He was the gardener of the house, tending the plants in front of their Thornhill home where they lived for the last decade. But that responsibility — and all responsibilities — now fall on Maloles' tiny shoulders.In late April, the 65-year-old personal support worker started to feel feverish, and test results later showed she had COVID-19. She stayed in her room, under quarantine, while Torres and the couple's daughter dropped off meals outside her door.As the days went along, Torres began feeling unwell too. The 69-year-old retired factory worker brushed off his family's concerns. But on April 27, he was so pale and weak that Maloles and her daughter helped the tall, hunched-over father make the short walk to their car so the family could take him to a nearby hospital.That same day, Torres was admitted to the intensive care unit. Maloles never saw him in-person again while he was conscious. He died in hospital on May 26."We didn't have any closure, to say goodbye," Maloles says, her normally-jovial voice stifled by tears."I'm so stressed, and blaming myself because I got the virus," she adds. "If I didn't get the virus — maybe he would not die."More than 5,000 infected healthcare workersSo far, more than 5,000 health-care workers across Ontario have contracted COVID-19, making up close to 17 per cent of all cases. Multiple frontline staff have also died. What's less clear is how often infected workers are spreading the virus to their loved ones — leading to unbearable family tragedies like what Maloles is now experiencing.The long-term care home where she has worked since 2005 — Villa Leonardo Gambin in Vaughan — has been a hotbed for COVID-19 cases, with more than 75 infections confirmed among residents and staff amid an ongoing outbreak that has left 11 people dead."One of the untold stories of this pandemic is what happens to the selfless heroes who become infected while caring for our sick and elderly when they go home," says Charlene Nero, a regional director with LiUNA Local 3000, the union representing Maloles in her role."Their valiant and heroic commitment doesn't stop when they walk out the doors of their workplaces."The union is among those calling for better protections for healthcare workers in long-term care. Maloles says in her workplace, there was limited access to personal protective equipment, even after the outbreak started in early April.Her union is also accusing the company managing the home, Sienna Senior Living — which owns dozens of long-term care and retirement homes across Ontario, including multiple ones facing deadly outbreaks — of not providing any sick pay or compensation to Maloles after May 8 while she continued recovering at home.The company also made headlines recently after a high-ranking official with Sienna-owned Woodbridge Vista Care Community in Vaughan, Ont. lost her job after she was overheard mocking residents' family members during a virtual town hall.In a statement provided by email to CBC News, Andrew Iacobelli, chair of the board of directors for Villa Leonardo Gambin, said the facility has worked to ensure there are ample supplies of personal protective equipment available, including N95 masks, both before and during the pandemic.A Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) claim is submitted to the board for consideration when employees test positive for COVID-19 since they must self-isolate for 14 days, Iacobelli said in response to a CBC News question about compensation for ill workers."After an employee has been cleared to return to work, they will be moved off WSIB when the claim is approved," he said.When asked about the broader risks facing healthcare workers, and what the province plans to do to protect them as Ontario continues reopening, health minister Christine Elliott stressed the ongoing efforts to procure personal protective equipment for healthcare staff."It's a tragedy that anyone has lost their life due to COVID-19," she said.'I don't know what to do'A tragedy Maloles now knows herself.Sitting in the garden her partner planted, she flips through a photo album, showing photos of the couple in their younger years.There's Torres riding a bike, with a grinning Maloles perched with her feet on the bars; there's the young Filipino couple standing with the CN Tower behind them after moving to Canada decades ago; there's a pregnant, beaming Maloles with Torres in 1994, both clad in white shirts and baseball caps.Life wasn't always so rosy, Maloles admits. Several years ago, Torres was hit by a driver on his daily bike ride, and struggled with depression and lingering dizziness which left him largely housebound.That's why Maloles assumes she brought the virus to him — she was always "work, work, work," she says, while in his retirement years, he was the one at home.One of the most challenging aspects of watching his decline, the longtime personal support worker recalls, was knowing what all the medical updates from hospital staff really meant. His fever just wouldn't go away, they told her. His lungs collapsed, they said; then, his lungs were barely functioning at all. She knew just how bad it was.Maloles now keeps her late husband's ashes in their home as part of a makeshift memorial. Life, she says, will go on. Somehow."I was so sad," she adds, crying. "Layers and layers of stress is coming to my head. I don't know what to do."

  • Prince William reveals his 'secret' job at a crisis text line
    Celebrity
    Yahoo Celebrity

    Prince William reveals his 'secret' job at a crisis text line

    Prince William has been quietly volunteering for the 24/7 crisis text line Shout, which he launched with Kate Middleton, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

  • I’m Immunocompromised. Marching For George Floyd Could Kill Me, But I’m Still Doing It.
    Health
    HuffPost

    I’m Immunocompromised. Marching For George Floyd Could Kill Me, But I’m Still Doing It.

    "I’ll step out again, even if this time ends up being the last time."

  • Will a copper face mask protect against COVID-19? Experts aren't so sure
    Science
    Yahoo Canada Style

    Will a copper face mask protect against COVID-19? Experts aren't so sure

    Could masks made of copper reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus?

  • Here's When Jeopardy! Will Run Out of Original Episodes Due to COVID-19
    Entertainment
    TVLine.com

    Here's When Jeopardy! Will Run Out of Original Episodes Due to COVID-19

    Jeopardy! will soon be in all-encore mode. TVLine has learned that the iconic Alex Trebek-hosted game show — which halted production roughy three months ago due to the coronavirus pandemic — will air its last original episode on Friday, June 12. Reruns begin airing on Monday, June 15 and will continue until the show deems it […]

  • Trump Campaign’s Plea For Video Messages To Celebrate President’s Birthday Backfires
    Politics
    HuffPost

    Trump Campaign’s Plea For Video Messages To Celebrate President’s Birthday Backfires

    The request sparked a wave of anger on Twitter.

  • Washington Post Uncovers Owner Jeff Bezos’ 2020 Charitable Gifts: Equivalent to $85 for Median American
    News
    The Wrap

    Washington Post Uncovers Owner Jeff Bezos’ 2020 Charitable Gifts: Equivalent to $85 for Median American

    The Washington Post took a dive Thursday into the charitable giving of the 50 wealthiest people and families in America, revealing that many of them — like the paper’s owner Jeff Bezos — didn’t contribute “much, when accounting for their vast personal fortunes,” as the coronavirus ravaged the American economy and killed thousands.The paper did not shy away from shining a critical light on its owner.“Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, the wealthiest man in the world with a fortune of $143 billion and who is also the owner of The Washington Post, gave $100 million to Feeding America and up to $25 million for All in WA, a statewide relief effort in Washington,” the Post noted. “For the median American, Bezos’ giving is the equivalent of donating $85. His aerospace company, Blue Origin, pledged to 3-D print face shields for front line workers but did not disclose the value of that contribution.”Also Read: CNN Disputes Trump's Chris Cuomo Jab: 'Surely You Have More Important Issues Than TV Ratings'The Post heralded only two billionaires for stepping “into the spotlight”: Bill Gates and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey. While the paper highlighted Gates’ leadership during the crisis and the work done by his foundation, it noted, “In terms of donations from his personal wealth, for the median American donor, Gates’s giving to date equates to about $283.”Comparatively, the Post found, Dorsey’s giving equated to $27,000 for the median American.The 50 wealthiest people and families surveyed for the project have a collective net worth of nearly $1.6 trillion. Their publicly announced donations amounted to $1 billion or so, “which sounds like a lot of money but adds up to less than .1 percent of their combined wealth,” said the Post.“More than half of these billionaires have publicly donated cash and a few say they have given something — money or in-kind contributions — but declined to specify how much. But almost a third have not announced any donations and declined to comment or did not reply to requests for comment,” it said.Read original story Washington Post Uncovers Owner Jeff Bezos’ 2020 Charitable Gifts: Equivalent to $85 for Median American At TheWrap