• Goo Hara death: K-pop singer found dead aged 28
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    The Independent

    Goo Hara death: K-pop singer found dead aged 28

    K-pop singer and former Kara band member Goo Hara has been found dead at her home, according to the Gangnam Police Department.“We received a report on November 24, 6:30 pm KST about a death,” they said in a statement. “We are currently investigating the cause.”

  • Bride and bishop shot by gunman during wedding
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    The Independent

    Bride and bishop shot by gunman during wedding

    A bride and bishop were shot during a wedding ceremony after a gunman burst into a church and opened fire.Stanley Choate, 75, who was presiding over the wedding, was shot in the chest, while the bride, 60-year-old Claire McMullen was shot in the arm.

  • Plants prescribed for anxiety and depression in new 'feelgood' scheme
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    The Independent

    Plants prescribed for anxiety and depression in new 'feelgood' scheme

    Doctors have started prescribing pot plants instead of pills in a new scheme for patients in Manchester.A GP practice is harnessing the well-known feelgood effects of greenery and gardening to treat people suffering from anxiety, depression and loneliness.

  • Mormons ban vaping, green tea and any drinks ending in 'ccino'
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    The Independent

    Mormons ban vaping, green tea and any drinks ending in 'ccino'

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wants to make clear that vaping, green tea and fancy coffee drinks are off limits under the religion's dietary code, which is meant to keep members from consuming unhealthy substances.Mormon leaders pointed to an article in its youth magazine New Era which reminded readers that the Word of Wisdom prohibits “hot drinks”, understood to mean tea and coffee, and harmful or habit-forming substances.E-cigarettes are highly addictive, “iced tea is still tea” and any drink ending in “-ccino” probably has coffee and breaks the rules, the church wrote.Recreational marijuana is also banned but medical marijuana and opioids are fine when used as prescribed by a doctor.The Christian sect - widely known as the Mormon church \- had previously said it approved of medical marijuana in certain circumstances, but last year it opposed a medical marijuana bill in Utah that it said went too far.Experts and church members said the clarifications raised as many questions as they answered.For example, there is still confusion over why is iced tea off limits if it's cold, what the church's stance on coffee-flavoured desserts is and whether drinks with green-tea extract are allowed. Lauren Lethbridge is a student newspaper editor at Brigham Young University, which is sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. For her, following the Word of Wisdom is about obedience to the church.She said several of her friends drink juices with green-tea extract. Many of them feel fine about the extract but one friend vowed to throw out her drinks immediately.“I think people are still concerned and a little stressed about 'does this qualify?' or 'is this bad?' ” said Ms Lethbridge. “But I think less people are having it be a major concern for them.”The Word of Wisdom is a section of the Doctrine and Covenants, one of the church's four volumes of scripture. Mormons believe God revealed the foods and substances that are good and bad for people to consume in 1833. Liquor, tobacco, tea and coffee were prohibited.Heber Grant, a church president, decided in the 20th century to drill down on the rules and to make adherence a prerequisite for entering a Mormon temple, said Gregory Prince, a historian of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.Beer and wine were initially acceptable, while liquor was not. Eventually all alcohol became off limits.Church members in recent years have debated whether soda, which typically has caffeine, is prohibited.After prominent church member and then-Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney attracted attention in 2012 for drinking Diet Coke on the campaign trail, the church clarified that it has no rule against caffeine itself.Mormon has dance off with Michael Jackson impersonator - London LivThe church tends to issue clarifications when it gets a lot of questions about the same substance or when it realises members in different locations are not on the same page, Mr Prince said.He said church members also vary in how closely they follow the Word of Wisdom, which he called “a living document".Adhering to the dietary rules signals to others that someone is a church member, Mr Prince said. He said the practice is similar to how Jews might keep kosher as a way of demonstrating their faith.“That this is how we self-identify within our tribe,” he said. “This is your outward living of your inward religion.”Jana Riess, author of The Next Mormons, said there is a generational gap: older Mormons are more likely to be dogmatic about the Word of Wisdom.Independent Minds Events: get involved in the news aA study Ms Riess conducted found 40 per cent of millennial or Generation X church members said they had consumed caffeinated coffee in the past six months. Thirty-eight percent of members with permission to enter the temples said they had consumed at least one of the forbidden substances.Despite the continuous debate about interpretation, Ms Riess said the Word of Wisdom is not supposed to be a list of commandments with defined borders. She cited a quote from church founder Joseph Smith that she said was meant to guide members' dietary choices: “I teach them correct principles, and they govern themselves.”“People really want to know what the rules are, where the boundaries are, how far is too far,” Ms Riess said. “I feel sorry for the leaders of the church in trying to respond to this because I think that they would much rather have members understand that they have good principles and can govern themselves.”The Washington Post

  • Why coffee before bed may not be so bad after all
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    The Telegraph

    Why coffee before bed may not be so bad after all

    Caffeine is known to be a powerful stimulant which perks up drinkers, increases alertness and promotes wakefulness.

  • McDonald's admits 'eco-friendly' paper straws that replaced plastic are not recyclable
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    The Telegraph

    McDonald's admits 'eco-friendly' paper straws that replaced plastic are not recyclable

    McDonald's have admitted that their 'eco-friendly' paper straws cannot be recycled, while previous plastic ones could be.

  • Three schoolgirls banned from end-of-year prom for going on climate strike over looming global catastrophe
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    The Independent

    Three schoolgirls banned from end-of-year prom for going on climate strike over looming global catastrophe

    Three students have been banned from their end-of-year prom after skipping revision classes to attend a school climate strike. Ellie Kinloch, Tyler McHugh, and Isobel Deady, all 16, missed school to take part in a climate change youth protest in Manchester city centre on Friday 24 May.When they returned to Albany Academy in Chorley, Lancashire, they were told by headteacher Peter Mayland that they would not be allowed to attend the end of year prom on 28 June. But all three pupils said they informed the school of their plans beforehand and belive the protest should have been considered an “exceptional circumstance”.Mr Mayland says their attendance at the Youth Strike 4 Climate protest represents an “unauthorised absence”, for which the pupils should be disciplined.The students' parents met with the headteacher and offered to pay a fine, have their children go to detention or embark on some sort of environmental project to help the school.School officials have refused to reverse their decision.Ellie's mother, Karen Fogg, said: “They've done nothing wrong in five years at this school, they’ve never been in trouble once.“You’ve got children [going to prom] with worse disciplinary records who have done far worse than skip school for something they believe in.“We accept it as an unauthorised absence but we don’t accept the weight of the punishment.”The 24 May protest was inspired by 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg and was open to students who believe in combating climate change.Karen Kinloch, Ellie's mother, said: “The day before the protest they were told it was not authorised and that it would put everything at risk.“But the school told this to the girls and not us as parents.“If they had told me in advance I would have made a decision, we've spent £500 on Ellie for the prom in dresses, tickets, transport.“Ellie is devastated. We all are. We’ve never felt so strongly about anything like this.“The others are livid with it all, everyone is pretty upset.”The students were told about the prom ban on Monday 3 June, which was the first school day after returning from half term and the first school day after attending the protest.Ms Kinloch added: “The girls don't drink or smoke, they are good kids. This is what they believe in and what they’re passionate about. It’s a good thing.”Mr Mayland said: “Albany Academy has an excellent reputation, based on the high standards we have, especially for students' attendance, behaviour and safety.“Our rule on attendance during exams has been in place for many years: Year 11 children need to be in school to prepare fully for their GCSEs.“Where a student has unauthorised absence, we apply sanctions. We do this fairly and we always take into account the needs of individual students and their specific circumstances.“We make our expectations to parents and students very clear, both verbally and in writing.“For Year 11 students, our prom is a voluntary privilege, and one element of our celebrations of their time at Albany Academy.“This privilege may be removed in the event of poor attendance or poor behaviour during the final term of Year 11.”Wendy Bicknell, Ellie’s godmother, warned that it set a bad precedent for being honest with schools on such matters.She said: “It tells me that honesty isn’t the best policy.“If they had just said they were ill and not told the truth this wouldn’t be happening.”Janine Deady, Isobel’s mother, said she feels the school is “making an example of our daughters for taking strike action”.She said: “We hear so often that young people are apathetic but it’s not the case. The girls are an example of that.”Ms Deady said Isobel decided to join the protest after seeing a lot of things in the media about environmental damage, including the Our Planet documentary with Sir David Attenborough.She said: “Isobel considered very carefully taking the day off for the strike action, it was not taken lightly at all.“She considered it very carefully before making the decision because there is nothing else open to them at their age as a way of expressing themselves.“They can’t vote and will be the generation most affected by damage to the planet.“We consider it was exceptional circumstances. It comes as the government has declared a climate emergency. I was happy for her to express herself and join the youth fight.“The punishment doesn’t fit the crime. This was her first unauthorised absence in her five years there.”A petition has been launched Change.org by Ms Bicknell in a bid to have Mr Mayland reverse his decision.SWNS