• Ontario confirms new case of coronavirus, patient had travelled to Iran
    Style
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario confirms new case of coronavirus, patient had travelled to Iran

    TORONTO — A woman who recently travelled to Iran has been diagnosed as Ontario's fifth novel coronavirus patient, Ontario's top public health official announced Wednesday.Dr. David Williams offered few details about the Toronto-based case, which involved a woman in her 60s. But the province's chief medical officer of health said the case came to light on Monday when she arrived at a local hospital emergency department.While most previous patients diagnosed with the virus known as COVID-19 had recently spent time in China, the epicentre of the global outbreak that's infected an estimated 80,000 people so far, Williams said the Toronto woman's recent travel history centred on Iran where a rash of new cases have recently emerged."The patient was cared for at the hospital using all appropriate precautions, including being isolated as she was tested for COVID-19," Williams said in a statement.He said the woman was ultimately released and sent home to go into self-isolation. Health officials are monitoring the situation and following up with the woman's close contacts, he added.Williams is expected to provide more information at a news conference early Wednesday afternoon.Ontario has identified four previous cases of COVID-19 in the province. While three of them have since been cleared, a new case was diagnosed in Toronto over the weekend.Officials said that patient, a woman in her 20s, had recently returned from China and is considered to have a mild case of the virus.Seven cases have been identified in British Columbia, including some linked to recent travel to Iran.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 26, 2020. The Canadian Press

  • Hedley frontman Jacob Hoggard to face trial on sex-related charges in Jan. 2021
    Style
    The Canadian Press

    Hedley frontman Jacob Hoggard to face trial on sex-related charges in Jan. 2021

    TORONTO — Jacob Hoggard, the frontman for the Canadian rock band Hedley, is scheduled to stand trial on three sex-related charges next year.The trial is set to begin in a downtown Toronto courthouse on Jan. 4, 2021.That will be more than two years after the singer was arrested in connection with alleged incidents involving a woman and a teenager.Hoggard, 35, pleaded not guilty at his two-day preliminary hearing to sexual assault causing bodily harm and sexual interference.He also opted to be tried by a jury rather than a judge alone.The case was given the green light to proceed to trial last summer after the preliminary hearing during which prosecutors gave an overview of their evidence.That evidence cannot be published due to a publication ban meant to protect the accused's right to a fair trial. A separate publication ban also bars identifying the complainants.Hoggard was arrested and charged in the summer of 2018 after allegations of sexual misconduct surfaced, suggesting inappropriate encounters with young fans. Toronto police have said the charges relate to three separate incidents involving a woman and a girl under the age of 16 that allegedly occurred in the Toronto area in 2016.Hoggard issued a statement in February 2018 in which he denied engaging in non-consensual sexual behaviour, but acknowledged having behaved in a way that "objectified women" and being "reckless and dismissive of their feelings."He also said on Twitter that he understood the "significant harm" his actions had caused and was "truly sorry."Hedley has been on an indefinite hiatus since March 2018, playing its last show in Kelowna, B.C. The band, which is based in Vancouver, was also dropped by its management team and banned by multiple radio stations in the wake of the allegations.Some of the early hearings in the case were attended by fans of the band even when Hoggard himself was not present.The next hearing in the case is scheduled for Jan. 14.This report by The Canadian Press was first published on Jan. 8, 2020.Paola Loriggio, The Canadian Press

  • 1 in 3 women experienced unwanted sexual behaviour in public last year: study
    Style
    The Canadian Press

    1 in 3 women experienced unwanted sexual behaviour in public last year: study

    TORONTO — Newly released government data show one in three Canadian women reported experiencing unwanted sexual behaviour while out in public last year, compared with one in eight men.The findings released today by Statistics Canada show women were also more likely than men to report certain forms of violence, including sexual assault and sexual harassment in the workplace, than men.The study on gender-based violence examined behaviours and experiences ranging from those that do not necessarily constitute a crime to those, like sexual assault, that are criminal offences. It says the most common types of unwanted sexual behaviour women reported experiencing in public were unwanted attention, with 25 per cent of women saying they had been on the receiving end, followed by unwanted physical contact, at 17 per cent, and unwanted comments about their sex or gender, at 12 per cent.Those were also the most common types of behaviour men reported experiencing, at six per cent for each.Across the board, those between the ages of 15 and 24 or who are not heterosexual were more likely to report experiencing unwanted sexual behaviour in public.The study also looked at gender-based violence in other spaces, such as the internet and the workplace.While roughly the same amount of men and women — 56 and 53 per cent, respectively — reported having witnessed inappropriate sexual behaviour in the workplace, women were more likely to experience it themselves, the data show.Nearly a third of women said they were the target of inappropriate sexual behaviours at work, compared with 17 per cent of men, the study says. Both said the most common type of inappropriate behaviour was sexual jokes.In predominantly male workplaces, nearly 40 per cent of women said they experienced inappropriate sexual behaviour, more than double the proportion of men who did.Women still reported experiencing inappropriate sexual behaviours twice as much as men did in workplaces with a more equal gender split, the study says. Workplaces with largely female staff saw similar proportions of men and women — 24 and 27 per cent respectively — report that they experienced inappropriate sexual behaviour. Online, women were slightly more likely to report being harassed last year: 18 per cent compared with 14 per cent of men. They were also more likely to have taken measures to protect themselves from harassment, including blocking or deleting accounts.Overall, more than 11 million Canadians reported experiencing at least one physical or sexual assault since the age of 15, not counting those committed by intimate partners.Sexual assault was more common among women, with 30 per cent of all women saying they had experienced sexual assault outside of an intimate relationship at least once since the age of 15. Eight per cent of men reported the same.Among women who said they had been sexually assaulted in the year before the survey, the same proportion (44 per cent) said it was at the hands of a stranger or someone they knew by sight, as said it was by a friend or acquaintance. More men had experienced a physical assault, however, with 33 per cent reporting one since the age of 15 compared with 26 per cent of women.The study says the "vast majority" of incidents of violent crime did not come to the attention of police, with only five per cent of women saying the most serious incident of sexual assault they'd experienced had been reported to authorities.That proportion rose to 26 per cent for women and 33 per cent for men in case of physical assault.This report by The Canadian Press was first published on Dec. 5, 2019.Paola Loriggio, The Canadian Press