• I’m happy for Chloë Sevigny, but the lesson is not that anyone can get pregnant at 45
    Entertainment
    The Guardian

    I’m happy for Chloë Sevigny, but the lesson is not that anyone can get pregnant at 45

    I’m happy for Chloë Sevigny, but the lesson is not that anyone can get pregnant at 45. Late pregnancies shouldn’t be framed as freakish feats or guaranteed back-up plans, but as stories of chance

  • Jillian Michaels believes 'political correctness' is 'glamourizing obesity' - and that's not OK
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Canada Style

    Jillian Michaels believes 'political correctness' is 'glamourizing obesity' - and that's not OK

    "It takes effort to think of weight as a symptom of disease - rather than the culprit."

  • Is your home constantly set to a 'sexist' temperature? You're not alone
    Science
    The Guardian

    Is your home constantly set to a 'sexist' temperature? You're not alone

    Is your home constantly set to a 'sexist' temperature? You're not aloneA new study finds men tend to get their way in household temperature discussions while women must compromiseTemperature is about more than just comfort. Photograph: Andrew_Howe/Getty Images

  • In defense of kids looking at phones - yes, even Kardashian kids
    News
    Yahoo Canada Style

    In defense of kids looking at phones - yes, even Kardashian kids

    "What I do know is that I have something in common with Kim K. I’m a parent."

  • There's a big problem with Olivia Munn's essay slamming fashion bloggers
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Canada Style

    There's a big problem with Olivia Munn's essay slamming fashion bloggers

    “Their blatant hypocrisy is nauseating."

  • Ineffective, insecure, overdue: the ‘porn block’ gets everything wrong
    Technology
    The Guardian

    Ineffective, insecure, overdue: the ‘porn block’ gets everything wrong

    ‘If anyone knows how to circumvent restrictions, it’s a teenager’. (Image posed by model). Photograph: Getty Images Britain has been a breeding ground for stupid ideas lately. While Brexit may be the biggest and baddest example, the UK government’s plans to implement what has been dubbed the world’s first “porn block” comes a close second. The new restrictions, to be introduced as part of the 2017 Digital Economy Act, will require pornography sites to verify that visitors are over 18. This may involve uploading a passport or driving license to prove your age, or buying a “porn pass” from a newsagent. After long delays the law was expected to go into effect this month, but the government recently announced it has been postponed again. Now, in theory, restricting access to porn via strict age-verification methods seems like a sensible and necessary thing to do. The average age of a child’s first exposure to pornography is just 11 years old; it is terrifyingly easy for kids to access explicit material online. So it is understandable that 83% of parents recently polled by the not-for-profit organisation Internet Matters support age-verification on commercial porn sites. However, things are generally a lot more complicated in practice than they are in theory, and the government’s ludicrous age block seems to have been devised by people who have no idea how the internet works. As Jim Killock, executive director of the UK’s Open Rights Group, put it: “The policy is completely full of holes.” He’s one of many digital experts who have warned that the restrictions are doomed to failure, and liable to do more harm than good. It doesn’t matter how anti-pornography you are: no one in their right mind should support this policy. To start with, the age block will be ridiculously easy to bypass – and if anyone knows how to circumvent restrictions, it’s a teenager. It’s simple to download tools that would let you circumvent the restrictions, such as a virtual private network or the anonymous Tor browser. The government itself has noted in an impact assessment that pushing people towards Tor, which is often used to surf the dark web, may also have the unintended consequence of exposing people “to illegal activities and more extreme material”. Then there are the privacy implications. It is not entirely clear what age-verification technology will be put in place, but one solution might be a service called AgeID, administered by MindGeek, an adult-entertainment behemoth that owns sites such as YouPorn and PornHub. MindGeek reckons about 25 million Brits might want to use its system. Do you really think it’s a great idea for a porn company to have the personal details of 25 million porn users stored in a central database? Because I’m sure plenty of hackers do. Spokespeople for AgeID have, predictably, made lots of reassuring noises about how safe people’s information would be with them, but I’m afraid I have a hard time trusting the Facebook of the smut industry. And even if the privacy implications don’t bother you (although they should), doesn’t it seem rather antithetical to crack down on porn by giving porn companies more power? Whatever your views on porn, Brits should give a XXXX about this very worrying legislation. • Arwa Mahdawi is a Guardian columnist

  • Opinion: Catholic woman's plea for young women to ditch leggings is not OK
    World
    Yahoo Canada Style

    Opinion: Catholic woman's plea for young women to ditch leggings is not OK

    “I’m just a Catholic mother of four sons with a problem that only girls can solve: leggings."

  • Karl Lagerfeld doesn't deserve a hall pass for the things he's said and done
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Canada Style

    Karl Lagerfeld doesn't deserve a hall pass for the things he's said and done

    "Is it possible to mourn the death of a true icon and still acknowledge that he was often a fatphobic, racist misogynist?"

  • Lisa Rinna, 55, rocks bikini, dismisses haters. Why do moms get so much pressure about what not to wear?
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Lifestyle

    Lisa Rinna, 55, rocks bikini, dismisses haters. Why do moms get so much pressure about what not to wear?

    This is an opinion piece by Lindsay Powers, author of the forthcoming book, You Can’t F*ck Up Your Kids. Reality star Lisa Rinna has a few choice words for anyone who dares judge her bikini body. The 55-year-old mom of two recently posted a photo of herself in a tiny Fendi bikini on Instagram.

  • VOTE: Would you host a 'fiver' party for your child?
    News
    Yahoo Canada Style

    VOTE: Would you host a 'fiver' party for your child?

    "I don't think it's any more tacky than saying your child has a wish list for their birthday."

  • 'I'm not a feminist, but...': Modern feminism from a teenager's perspective
    News
    Yahoo Style UK

    'I'm not a feminist, but...': Modern feminism from a teenager's perspective

    Is feminism relevant to young people in 2017? Throughout history women have toiled for gender equality. Today we enjoy the spoils of great women who came before us. In schools, girls are outperforming boys and are more likely to get five decent GCSE’s. A third of young women go on to study at university, compared with just a quarter of men. Young people would be excused for believing the fight for equality is over. Our teens, all digital natives, have lived their entire lives surrounded by information. The internet is enhancing the movement for gender equality. ...

  • What's the biggest discipline mistake you've ever made?
    News
    Hilary Hagerman

    What's the biggest discipline mistake you've ever made?

    By now you’ve probably seen the viral photos of a dad pushing a shopping cart in Walmart, pulling along his daughter by the hair. In the original Facebook post, which has now been shared more than 200,000 times, fellow shopper Erika Burch said that she confronted the man after seeing him dragging his daughter along.

  • Why Vogue Brazil’s Paralympic photoshoot fail is on all of us
    News
    Caleigh Rykiss

    Why Vogue Brazil’s Paralympic photoshoot fail is on all of us

    The only thing keeping me going is the fact the Paralympians will take center stage in Rio in just a few weeks. In attempts to boost attention, Vogue Brazil teamed up with the Paralympic committee for a photoshoot to promote the Games and draw attention to the athletes.  Sounds like a great idea, right? The limbs of soap stars Cléo Pires and Paulo Vilhena were digitally altered to mimic the real bodies of Brazilian Paralympians Renato Leite and Bruninha Alexandre.  I’m sorry, what?!  You have beautiful, accomplished and available athletes to shoot (yes, Renito and Bruninha were on hand for the photoshoot) but you choose instead to go with imposters? Vogue Brazil’s response: some weak justification that they didn’t actually put this shoot together, they just featured it, and that this was an attempt to support the Paralympic games by bringing in famous faces.

  • Splitting The Dinner Bill: Is It Ever Ok To Refuse?
    News
    Jasmine Jones

    Splitting The Dinner Bill: Is It Ever Ok To Refuse?

    [Photo: REX/Shutterstock]

  • New Girly Craft Beers Aim to Appeal to Ladies. Is That Really Necessary?
    News
    Nora Crotty

    New Girly Craft Beers Aim to Appeal to Ladies. Is That Really Necessary?

    Listen up, ladies! There’s a revolutionary new product that’s coming our way, made exclusively for us women folk: Beer! Maybe you've heard of it?

  • Why Lil’ Kim’s shocking ‘white’ look is our fault
    News
    Caleigh Rykiss

    Why Lil’ Kim’s shocking ‘white’ look is our fault

    Lil’ Kim has never shied away from changing up her look. From coloured wigs to avant garde getups (who can forget the purple nipple pasty from the 1999 VMAs?), Kim’s brave fashion choices in the ‘90s and 2000s paved the way for today’s risk takers like Lady Gaga, Nicki Minaj and Katy Perry.