• From 'No on Kavanaugh' to 'Stop calling 911 on the culture': NYFW is all about political statements
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    Julie Tong

    From 'No on Kavanaugh' to 'Stop calling 911 on the culture': NYFW is all about political statements

    The line between fashion and politics has become more blurred over the years. In 2016, Maria Grazia Chiuri became the first female artistic director at Dior , and her debut collection centered on female empowerment  for this historic moment at the storied fashion house. In celebration, she designed a T-shirt that said, “We Should All Be Feminists.” In 2017, shortly after the U.S. presidential election the previous November, designers continued to showcase their political stances through fashion. During designer Prabal Gurung ’s Fall 2017 show, he had models Bella Hadid and Candice Huffine walk down the runway wearing shirts that read, “The Future Is Female,” “Our Minds Our Bodies Our Power,” and “Nevertheless, She Persisted.” Celebrity favorite designer  Tom Ford , known for his glitzy old Hollywood designs, debuted a chain handbag on his catwalk that said “Pussy Power,”  alluding to the pink pussy hats  worn during the Women’s March in January 2017. Political statements have also reached far outside the traditional “big four” fashion weeks (New York, London, Milan, and Paris). During Seoul Fashion Week in March earlier this year, Miss Gee Collection debuted two sweaters emblazoned with the words “#MeToo” and “Speak Up” in bold crimson letters in reference to the #MeToo movement that has swept around the globe. This season is no different.  New York Fashion Week designers continue to use their catwalk shows to take political stands. Above, we present the political statements made at fashion week so far. Read more from Yahoo Lifestyle: • Fashion designer casts all Asian models for historic NYFW show  • Political slogan tee strikes at NYFW: ‘Vote for Cynthia’ Nixon  • Curvy model causes a stir in ‘Sample-Size’ T-shirt at NYFW’s most diverse show  Follow us on Instagram , Facebook , and Twitter for nonstop inspiration delivered fresh to your feed, every day.

  • Sinclair Media's local news anchors reportedly have a jewel-tone dress code
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    Kerry Justich

    Sinclair Media's local news anchors reportedly have a jewel-tone dress code

    Various national outlets have received documentation of Sinclair's explicit instructions to outlets detailing how stations should operate and even how on-air employees should dress.

  • This website is being slammed for selling an Anne Frank Halloween costume
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    Jessica Ankomah

    This website is being slammed for selling an Anne Frank Halloween costume

    “There are more appropriate ways to commemorate her legacy than through a Halloween costume, which is offensive and trivializes her suffering."

  • How Steve Aoki Responds to Trump’s America Through Fashion
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    Alexandra Mondalek

    How Steve Aoki Responds to Trump’s America Through Fashion

    DJ Steve Aoki shut down a whole block in downtown Manhattan for a runway show turned concert, and debuted some politically charged clothing for his new collection.

  • 6 Need-to-Know Trends from Milan Fashion Week
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    Dora Fung

    6 Need-to-Know Trends from Milan Fashion Week

    Three cities down and on to Paris we go! After five days of shows and presentations in Milan it’s time to say arrivedecci — but first, a look at the trends that defined the week. Milan has always felt a little stuck in a time warp and mainly because of their classic craftsmanship and the quality of the goods they produce but this time, I am talking about Milanese’s taste in music. The music at so many shows was a straight up throw back to the 80s, from The Cure “Friday I’m in love” at Alberta Ferretti, Pat Benatar’s “We are Young” at No.21, Tiffany’s “I think we’re alone now” at Attico, to Patsy Kensit’s “I’m not scared” at Blumarine, Milan has been all about the throw back rather than the future.

  • Syrian refugees get dressed up as Disney princess and share their dreams for the future
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    Simone Olivero

    Syrian refugees get dressed up as Disney princess and share their dreams for the future

    All images via Instagram/sainthoax The love for Disney stretches far and wide.  At least that’s what artist Saint Hoax discovered while visiting a refugee camp in Akkar, Lebanon. A Syrian citizen herself, the artists teamed up with MALAAK, an NGO providing aid and education for Syrian refugees, and a team of girls currently residing at the came for a project entitled, “Once Upon a War.” “’Once Upon a War’ is the outcome of my life-altering encounter with these girls,” Saint Hoax explains.  “Most of them never get the chance to play pretend because their reality is over dominating.