• Military shaves restrictions on women in uniform wearing ponytails
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    The Canadian Press

    Military shaves restrictions on women in uniform wearing ponytails

    OTTAWA — The Canadian military isn't letting its hair down just yet, but for the first time, women in uniform will be allowed to wear ponytails.The move, which also makes nylon stockings optional when in a skirt and permits flat shoes instead of pumps or oxfords, is the latest effort to modernize the Canadian Armed Forces after the recent easing of restrictions on beards, boots and off-duty marijuana use.It also comes amid a concerted effort by senior commanders to increase the number of women in the military, which has so far moved slower than some had hoped."We know that greater control over personal appearance is good for the morale of current CAF members and that it helps us attract future members to our team," said Chief Warrant Officer Alain Guimond, the military's top non-commissioned officer. "Overall, we're trying to better reflect the Canadians we serve while welcoming new members into our ranks."Previously, female military personnel with long hair were required to keep it in braids or buns while on duty. They were also required to wear five-centimetre pumps or oxford shoes as well as nylons if they were working in skirts.Why those restrictions? Tradition? Safety, in the case of ponytails? Defence officials couldn't immediately answer that question.Not that the military is throwing away the rulebook entirely; only one ponytail is allowed and it must be "gathered in the centre back of the head," according to new guidance issued to military personnel this week.Pippi Longstocking, that means you.Ponytails are also not allowed with ceremonial uniforms and, in defiance of such trendsetters as Ariana Grande, they can't go "below the top of the armpit."And although the shoe rules for women are being loosened to allow flats, the freedom does not extend to "ballerina-slipper styles."As for men, sorry, you're going to have to do your David Beckham impressions at home: No ponytails for you, even the short variety.As with last fall's decision to allow beards in more circumstances, this latest move has received mixed reactions from service members and veterans on social media, with some praising the move as long overdue and others worrying the military will look less professional.But it likely won't hurt the military's efforts to recruit and retain more women in uniform.Defence chief Gen. Jonathan Vance publicly asserted in February 2016, shortly after taking command of the Forces, that he wanted women to be 25 per cent of the military by 2026. At that time, barely 15 per cent of service members were women.Figures provided by the Department of National Defence showed that at the beginning of January that had grown to 15.7 per cent, a rate of increase that Vance acknowledged to The Canadian Press was slower than he had anticipated.— Follow @leeberthiaume on Twitter.Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press

  • Julianna Margulies applauded for turning down 'The Good Fight' guest gig over money issue: 'Stand your ground for equal pay!'
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    Suzy Byrne

    Julianna Margulies applauded for turning down 'The Good Fight' guest gig over money issue: 'Stand your ground for equal pay!'

    The actress won’t be appearing on “The Good Wife” spinoff “The Good Fight,” and she says it’s because CBS lowballed her in negotiations for a three-episode arc.

  • Manitoba government under fire for 'demeaning' nursing messages
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    Yahoo Canada Original Videos

    Manitoba government under fire for 'demeaning' nursing messages

    The Manitoba government is facing harsh criticism for a campaigned aimed to recruit nurses.

  • Photo of girl wearing 'Nurse in Training' and boy in 'Doctor in Training' scrubs slammed as sexist
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    Paulina Cachero

    Photo of girl wearing 'Nurse in Training' and boy in 'Doctor in Training' scrubs slammed as sexist

    "The children are cute. The sexism on their backs is NOT," wrote one Twitter user about a photo of children in scrubs with labels based on outdated professional gender biases.

  • Man faces backlash after sharing his 12-step guide for women: 'Wear pink' and 'listen to men'
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    Kristine Solomon

    Man faces backlash after sharing his 12-step guide for women: 'Wear pink' and 'listen to men'

    A man has incited the wrath of the internet by tweeting a list of "incredibly sexist" ways for women to be beautiful.

  • Middle school student told to cover up T-shirt with message teacher found offensive
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    Kristine Solomon

    Middle school student told to cover up T-shirt with message teacher found offensive

    A seventh grader was asked to cover up a shirt that teachers found offensive, but the girl's parents say the shirt touts a message of anti-discrimination.

  • Bias against funding Canada's female scientists revealed in study
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    CBC

    Bias against funding Canada's female scientists revealed in study

    A new Canadian analysis in The Lancet validates complaints that the awarding of research grants is biased against female scientists.The analysis found women are less likely to receive valuable research dollars if their grant applications are reviewed based on who the lead scientist is, rather that what the proposed project is.The study, titled "Are gender gaps due to evaluations of the applicant or the science?", analyzed almost 24,000 applications submitted to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) — the federal government agency that awards approximately $1 billion in science grants annually.The study's lead author, Holly Witteman, says CIHR created "a natural experiment" when in 2014 it established two new funding streams — the Project Grant Program, which focuses on funding "ideas with the greatest potential," while the Foundation Grant Program funds "research leaders."Men and women performed similarly in Project Grants — 13.5 per cent of male applicants and 12 per cent of female applicants were successful.But under the Foundation program — 13.9 per cent of male applicants won grants, compared to only 9.2 per cent of women.The disparity is most striking in the field of public health, where female applicants outnumber male applicants, but men are twice as likely to win Foundation grants — 14.1 per cent vs 6.7 per cent.Overall, grant applications from men outnumber those by women two to one.The analysis took applicants' age and field of study into account. "This evidence is fairly robust," said Witteman, a researcher at Laval University's Faculty of Medicine in Quebec City. "When the [grant] reviewers are told to focus on evaluating the scientists … that significantly amplifies success rates for men," she said.Grant awarding system brokenNeuroscientist Jennifer Raymond said the Canadian study is another indication that the research funding "system is broken and really needs to be fixed."Raymond is a researcher at California's Stanford University and wrote a commentary which appears in the same edition of The Lancet.She said female scientists might find the CIHR analysis both discouraging and vindicating."A lot of times women internalize and say 'Oh it's me, maybe, I'm not good enough, my male colleague is getting all of these awards and attention. I need to try harder,'" she told CBC News.But Witteman's research indicates women are being passed over. "And I think this shows that the system is biased," Raymond said.Raymond has also assessed grant applications for the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. equivalent of CIHR.> Getting funding can lead to more publications which can make it easier to attract good scientists to your lab, which in turn can help you do more good science and get more funding \- Jennifer Raymond"I sometimes hear comments that I wonder if they would be saying that if the applicant was a male scientist instead of a female scientist. But in any one of those cases, you can never really know what's motivating the comment. You can really only see the bias in the statistics."Funding begets more fundingGender equality has long eluded the sciences, especially at the leadership level. Raymond said funding bias plays a role in that disparity. "Small advantages over time can become big advantages. Getting funding can lead to more publications which can make it easier to attract good scientists to your lab, which in turn can help you do more good science and get more funding. So you know there's all of these different levels at which these biases play out."Raymond said she supports a "blinded" grant application process to protect female researchers from unintended bias. It's an approach increasingly adopted by recruiters and employers. When the Toronto Symphony Orchestra famously began concealing the identities of musicians during auditions in the 1980s, it transformed what was once a nearly all-male orchestra.For research scientists early in their careers, the cumulative effect of those first grants is often more opportunities down the road.Bias stalling innovationDr. Laura LaChance, a Toronto research psychiatrist and published academic who finished her residency in 2017, points out how important research is in advancing a career."Research is a major way that we're kind of measured against our colleagues in terms of how productive you are and how good of a candidate you are," said LaChance.LaChance said career advancement aside, bias against female researchers also results in "stalling innovation in clinical care."She said she also worries some frustrated women may simply quit their research efforts in frustration.Witteman, the study's author, credits CIHR for both collaborating on her gender research and taking steps to prevent further bias once the disparity in the Foundation grant program was clearly identified. In a statement, CIHR said it was committed to "systemic biases against any individual or group." The agency has developed an online course called "Unconscious Bias in Peer Review."

  • Roll up your sleeves and get in there': Russell Brand's hands-off parenting style sparks backlash online
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    Elizabeth Di Filippo

    Roll up your sleeves and get in there': Russell Brand's hands-off parenting style sparks backlash online

    "Not so good on the nappies and making sure they eat food."

  • Lawmaker wants dress code for parents so they stop wearing ‘sexually suggestive' clothes to school
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    Kristine Solomon

    Lawmaker wants dress code for parents so they stop wearing ‘sexually suggestive' clothes to school

    A critic of the proposed bill complained that it was "about disrespecting parents in front of their children."

  • Gillette called out for #PinkTax hypocrisy days after advert backlash
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    Francesca Specter

    Gillette called out for #PinkTax hypocrisy days after advert backlash

    The shaving brand is being told to put their money where their mouth is.

  • French Author Yann Moix, 50, Says Women Over 50 Are 'Invisible' To Him
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    Lee Moran

    French Author Yann Moix, 50, Says Women Over 50 Are 'Invisible' To Him

    A prize-winning French author faced backlash online after he reportedly

  • How women, not men, face discrimination at work for being overweight
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    Lydia Smith

    How women, not men, face discrimination at work for being overweight

    Research has shown women are far more likely to be judged based on their appearance at work - not just their clothes, hair and makeup, but also their weight.

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls out ‘double standards’ in American politics: Paul Ryan a ‘genius,’ while 'I’m called a ‘fraud’
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    Paulina Cachero

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls out ‘double standards’ in American politics: Paul Ryan a ‘genius,’ while 'I’m called a ‘fraud’

    Once again, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has called it as she sees it — this time taking aim at the double standard with which she argues that male and female politicians are treated by the media and the public.

  • University apologizes to student who was dress coded at the gym for 'distracting' crop top
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    Elise Solé

    University apologizes to student who was dress coded at the gym for 'distracting' crop top

    A Canadian university apologized to a student who was dress-coded for wearing a "distracting" crop top at the gym.

  • Ariana Grande slams Piers Morgan: 'Women can be sexual and talented'
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    Elizabeth Di Filippo

    Ariana Grande slams Piers Morgan: 'Women can be sexual and talented'

    "I say this with all due respect but thank u, next."

  • High school assistant principal apologizes after he is overheard calling female students 'skanky hoes'
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    Elise Solé

    High school assistant principal apologizes after he is overheard calling female students 'skanky hoes'

    The assistant principal at a California high school issued an apology in a recent issue of the student magazine, but mixed feelings remain.

  • Jon Bon Jovi's comments about Kim Kardashian are not OK
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    Krista Thurrott

    Jon Bon Jovi's comments about Kim Kardashian are not OK

    "What’s gonna be in your autobiography? ‘I made a porno and guess what, I got famous.’ F—, sorry, I’ll pass."

  • Style
    The Canadian Press

    Sex discrimination felt early despite equality beliefs, Canadian teens say

    Canadian teenagers begin noticing gender-based inequality early on, with girls feeling the effects especially acutely in sports and in cyberspace, a new survey suggests. The online survey of teens aged 12 to 17 indicates that girls are far more likely than boys to say they have been victimized by sexism. According to the Ipsos survey of 1,203 teens commissioned by the Girl Guides of Canada, 35 per cent of girls reported discrimination against them because of their gender, compared to 21 per cent of boys.

  • 'Armed and in killer heels': The sexist coverage of Meghan Markle's female bodyguard is condescending
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    Elise Solé

    'Armed and in killer heels': The sexist coverage of Meghan Markle's female bodyguard is condescending

    The physical appearance of Meghan's female bodyguard — who is just doing her job — has become a focus for some news outlets.

  • Teacher says 'blame the girls' for dress-code violations: 'They pretty much ruin everything'
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    Yahoo Style UK team

    Teacher says 'blame the girls' for dress-code violations: 'They pretty much ruin everything'

    Jared Hensley has since been placed on leave after suggesting boys blame girls for their high school's ban on athletic shorts.

  • 'Sexy' Handmaid's Tale costume is removed from sale after online backlash
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    'Sexy' Handmaid's Tale costume is removed from sale after online backlash

    "Apparently “sexy” Handmaid’s Tale costumes are a thing. For those who want to go as tone-deaf for Halloween."

  • High school principal under fire for suggesting that dress codes prevent sexual abuse: 'Why should we allow students to dress provocatively?'
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    Elise Solé

    High school principal under fire for suggesting that dress codes prevent sexual abuse: 'Why should we allow students to dress provocatively?'

    Parents are speaking out after a Chicago public school principal suggested that a stricter dress code could prevent the sexual abuse of girls.