• Sorry, Eating McDonald's French Fries Won't Actually Cure Your Baldness
    Style
    David Moye

    Sorry, Eating McDonald's French Fries Won't Actually Cure Your Baldness

    The Japanese researcher behind a new study that links an ingredient found in McDonald’s French fries with a treatment for baldness admits eating the fries will have no effect whatsoever.

  • Moms spend money on daughters, while dads spend on sons, study finds
    Style
    Maggie Parker

    Moms spend money on daughters, while dads spend on sons, study finds

    When asked bluntly, parents deny any favoritism based on their children’s gender, but a host of studies have found otherwise when it comes to gifts and spending.

  • Pregnant Women Who ‘Eat for Two’ Risk Harming Their Health
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Pregnant Women Who ‘Eat for Two’ Risk Harming Their Health

    Experts now warn that moms-to-be who believe in the “one for me, one for the baby” eating plan could risk harming their health and the health of their baby.

  • Long Women’s Bathroom Lines Can Be Fixed Easily, Scientists Say
    Style
    Korin Miller

    Long Women’s Bathroom Lines Can Be Fixed Easily, Scientists Say

    An average bathroom has 20 to 30 percent more places to pee for men than for women, researchers discovered.

  • These 5 Countries Are Getting the Most Plastic Surgery in the World
    Style
    Jessica Ankomah

    These 5 Countries Are Getting the Most Plastic Surgery in the World

    The top five countries with residents opting for plastic surgery are the United States, Brazil, Japan, Italy, and Mexico.

  • 'Period Brain' Doesn't Exist, Says New Study
    Style
    Lauren Sharkey

    'Period Brain' Doesn't Exist, Says New Study

    A new study has shown that women are just as competent while menstruating as when they’re not. Researchers from Ruhr University Bochum and Aristotle University of Thessaloniki studied 88 menstruating women.

  • Drinking Alcohol Might Make Your Cells Age Faster
    Style
    Korin Miller

    Drinking Alcohol Might Make Your Cells Age Faster

    While experts generally agree that drinking alcohol in moderation is OK, having too much alcohol has been linked to a slew of serious health problems like liver disease, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, and certain cancers. For the study, researchers analyzed the drinking history, alcohol habits, and DNA of 255 people, about half of whom sought alcoholism treatment services at a hospital in Japan. As a result, they get shorter over time, but certain things like alcohol abuse can also speed up this aging process. And, by having shortened telomere lengths, alcoholic participants were at a greater risk of developing age-related diseases like heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and dementia.

  • New Cancer Drug Is So Effective Against Tumors, the FDA Approved It Immediately
    Style
    Korin Miller

    New Cancer Drug Is So Effective Against Tumors, the FDA Approved It Immediately

    “The data was so good, they had to approve it.”

  • New Report Highlights States With Most Staggering Childcare Costs
    Style
    Jennifer Gerson Uffalussy

    New Report Highlights States With Most Staggering Childcare Costs

    In Washington, DC, childcare costs add up to over 89 percent of the typical single mom’s income. A new report released on Thursday by the Democratic members of the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee (JEC) on the state of childcare in America finds that access to high-quality early learning childcare is more critical than ever for American families — and even more difficult to find. The report found that access to affordable high-quality childcare will increase employment opportunities: For every 10 percent decrease in childcare costs, mothers are anywhere from 0.5 percent to 4 percent more likely to work.

  • Don’t Need Much Sleep? Science Says You’re Wrong
    Style
    Amy Capetta

    Don’t Need Much Sleep? Science Says You’re Wrong

    Get some shuteye, whether you think you need it or not, warns a new study.

  • ‘Multiracial’ People Seen as More Attractive Than Those Who Identify as ‘Black’
    Style
    Beth Greenfield

    ‘Multiracial’ People Seen as More Attractive Than Those Who Identify as ‘Black’

    “Being exotic is a compelling idea,” the author of a new study found regarding race and beauty.

  • Here’s More Evidence That Disney Princess Culture Harms Girls
    Style
    Beth Greenfield

    Here’s More Evidence That Disney Princess Culture Harms Girls

    Exposure to the princess ideal can mess with your daughter’s head, a new study finds.

  • The Science Behind Skin-to-Skin Contact
    Style
    Beth Greenfield

    The Science Behind Skin-to-Skin Contact

    Two photos of dads snuggling with their infants have gone viral this week, reigniting discussion about the power of skin-to-skin contact between parents and babies.

  • Study Says You’re Likely Using Old Makeup (and It’s More Dangerous Than You Thought)
    Style
    Beth Greenfield

    Study Says You’re Likely Using Old Makeup (and It’s More Dangerous Than You Thought)

    A pair of British studies has confirmed what most makeup users know: that (a) using out-of-date cosmetics can be risky business and (b) nobody really cares.

  • Man gets Photoshopped by 19 different artists around the world
    Style
    Simone Olivero

    Man gets Photoshopped by 19 different artists around the world

    Back in August, U.K.-based pharmacy Superdrug conducted an experiment on the perception of beauty by sending an image of a woman to graphic designers across the globe asking them to alter the body to suit their ideal of beauty. “Some men have almond-shaped eyes, thick eyebrows, or dark, heavy beards.

  • The Body Shape That Protects Women From Diabetes
    Style
    Korin Miller

    The Body Shape That Protects Women From Diabetes

    The findings, which were presented this weekend at the American Society of Human Genetics’ annual meeting, traced the connection to a genetic variation carried by women with hips that are larger in comparison to the rest of their body. The gene variation is inherited from a woman’s mother and doesn’t appear to have the same effect on men. According to a press release from the American Society of Human Genetics, researchers are currently investigating the discrepancy, but hypothesize that there may be a sex-specific protein that interacts with KLF14 and diminishes its impact on men. While the findings are surprising, Peter LePort, MD, medical director of the Memorial Care Center for Obesity at California’s Orange Coast Memorial Medical Care Center, tells Yahoo Health that he isn’t shocked.

  • Online Calculator Predicts Your Risk of Developing Breast Cancer
    Style
    Christine Erickson

    Online Calculator Predicts Your Risk of Developing Breast Cancer

    October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Assess your risk now with this handy online tool.  Scientists have created a new online calculator to help predict if you’ll develop breast cancer in the near future. The calculator involves just six questions based on your age, ethnicity and race, family history of breast cancer, whether you’ve had a breast biopsy, and your breast density. The calculator was tested using data from more than 1.1 million women, aged 35 to 74.

  • A Woman’s Body is Photoshopped into 18 Countries’ Ideals
    Style
    Noël Duan

    A Woman’s Body is Photoshopped into 18 Countries’ Ideals

    In the 1600s, William Shakespeare once wrote, “Beauty is bought by judgment of the eye,” explaining that beauty is subjective to the individual. UK-based pharmacy Superdrug commissioned marketing agency Fractl to ask graphic designers from 18 different countries to retouch an image of a woman’s body to “fit with their culture’s perceptions of beauty and an ideal female form.” The project was inspired by Esther Honig’s 2014 project, Before & After, in which she asked graphic designers to manipulate the face.