• Drink hot tea at your own risk: New study is latest to show link to esophageal cancer
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    USA TODAY

    Drink hot tea at your own risk: New study is latest to show link to esophageal cancer

    New research published Wednesday found that drinking extremely hot tea is associated with an increased risk in cancer of the esophagus.

  • Bad news: beer before wine won't 'make you fine'
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    Francesca Specter

    Bad news: beer before wine won't 'make you fine'

    This hangover prevention "trick" isn't all that useful.

  • Early exposure to peanuts may actually prevent allergies
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    Simone Olivero

    Early exposure to peanuts may actually prevent allergies

    In the last decade, peanut allergies have become a growing concern for parents — according to Health Canada, it’s one of the most common food allergies. Under the current Health Canada guidelines, parents are told to exclusively breastfeed (or use a breastfeeding alternative, like formula) before the age of 6 months. After that time, they can begin experimenting with solid foods and common allergens like peanut-based products, fish, wheat, milk, soy and eggs.

  • Social media may be making you ugly
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    Simone Olivero

    Social media may be making you ugly

    Got an addiction to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat? According to a recent study out of the University of Essex, heavy social media users reported being less satisfied with the way they look. “Parents of children who use social media apps are being warned that heavy usage could lead to insecurities later in life,” said the Evening Standard.

  • Thumb sucking and nail biting may not be gross habits after all
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    Simone Olivero

    Thumb sucking and nail biting may not be gross habits after all

    “Our findings are consistent with the hygiene theory that early exposure to dirt or germs reduces the risk of developing allergies,” Sears said in a press release. The study comes out of New Zealand’s Dunedin School of Medicine and looked at 1,037 kids born between 1972 and 1973. In the early years, parents were asked to rate whether their children were frequent thumb suckers or nail biters.