• Citizen scientist's all-natural spray sends ticks running in first tests
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    CBC

    Citizen scientist's all-natural spray sends ticks running in first tests

    Lisa Ali created AtlanTick after her two sons developed Lyme disease from ticks on the South Shore in 2016. Enter Nicoletta Faraone, a scientist at Acadia University's department of biology. With financial help from the Nova Scotia Productivity and Innovation voucher and a National Research Council grant, she created a tick habitat and put the ticks on a dish with three circles.

  • How a trip to the pumpkin patch almost turned deadly for one mom
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    Krista Thurrott

    How a trip to the pumpkin patch almost turned deadly for one mom

    “I couldn’t walk, my whole body was in pain, my hair fell out, and I almost died."

  • This Is the Only Thing You Should Do If a Tick Lands on You
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    Good Housekeeping

    This Is the Only Thing You Should Do If a Tick Lands on You

    "Folklore remedies" only put you at greater risk for dangerous diseases.

  • Powassan virus is deadlier than Lyme disease — but do you need to worry?
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    Jessica Ankomah

    Powassan virus is deadlier than Lyme disease — but do you need to worry?

    Lyme disease is reason enough to steer clear of pesky ticks, but experts are reporting the spread of a far deadlier tick-borne disease — one that has no treatment. It’s called Powassan virus and it’s transmitted by deer ticks just like Lyme disease. The good news is Powassan is still relatively rare in Canada, says Dr. Matthew Gilmour, the scientific director general of the Public Health Agency of Canada’s national microbiology laboratory.

  • Everything you need to know about ticks and Lyme disease -- and how to protect yourself
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    Gail Johnson

    Everything you need to know about ticks and Lyme disease -- and how to protect yourself

    An adult female (left) and nymph tick (Getty Images)Jim Wilson was dumbfounded by a large rash around his navel back in the spring of 1991. Within a few months he was having trouble walking, talking, and remembering. Several doctors’ visits and three years later, Wilson was finally diagnosed with Lyme disease, which he’d contracted from a tick bite.