Twitter offers more support to researchers -- to 'keep us accountable'

Natasha Lomas

Twitter has kicked off the New Year by taking the wraps off a new hub for academic researchers to more easily access information and support around its APIs -- saying the move is in response to feedback from the research community.

The new page -- which it's called 'Twitter data for academic researchers' -- can be found here.

It includes links to apply for a developer account to access Twitter's APIs; details of the different APIs offered and links to additional tools for researchers, covering data integration and access; analysis; visualization; and infrastructure and hosting.

"Over the past year, we’ve worked with many of you in the academic research community. We’ve learned about the challenges you face, and how Twitter can better support you in your efforts to advance understanding of the public conversation," the social network writes, saying it wants to "make it even easier to learn from the public conversation".

Twitter is also promising "more enhancements and resources" for researchers this year.

It's likely no accident the platform is putting a fresh lick of paint on its offerings for academics given that 2020 is a key election year in the U.S. -- and concerns about the risk of fresh election meddling are riding high.

Tracking conversation flow on Twitter also still means playing a game of 'bot or not' -- one that has major implications for the health of democracies. And in Europe Twitter is one of a number of platform giants which, in 2018, signed up to a voluntary Code of Practice on disinformation that commits it to addressing fake accounts and online bots, as well as to empowering the research community to monitor online disinformation via "privacy-compliant" access to platform data.

"At Twitter, we value the contributions of academic researchers and see the potential for them to help us better understand our platform, keeping us accountable, while helping us tackle new challenges through discoveries and innovations," the company writes on the new landing page for researchers while also taking the opportunity to big up the value of its platform -- claiming that "if it exists, it’s probably been talked about on Twitter".

If Twitter lives up to its promises of active engagement with researchers and their needs, it could smartly capitalize on rival Facebook's parallel missteps in support for academics.

Last year Facebook was accused of 'transparency-washing' with its own API for researchers, with a group of sixty academics slamming the ad archive API as as much a hinderance as a help.

Months later Facebook was still being reported to have done little to improve the offering.