Woman sparks huge debate after asking family to chip in to Christmas dinner

Lauren Sharkey
Is it wrong to ask for money for your Christmas dinner? [Photo: PA]
Is it wrong to ask for money for your Christmas dinner? [Photo: PA]

Christmas is the most expensive time of the year. It’s statistically proven with the average family spending around £800 in the festive period.

One woman has inadvertently sparked a big online debate after asking if it’s okay to ask guests to pay a small contribution for their Christmas dinner.

Writing on Mumsnet, the woman explained that she and her partner have had a tough year financially but agreed to host Christmas dinner for family (including her mum, three sons and their families).

She asked each of her guests to chip in a fiver to pay for the expensive joint of beef they wanted. Instead of agreeing, her mother refused as she believes she’s done enough for her daughter over the years. The woman then went on to state that her mum “is in a better position than any of us to contribute” as she has just received a large inheritance.

A big debate occurred after a woman asked her family to contribute £5 each [Photo: PA]
A big debate occurred after a woman asked her family to contribute £5 each [Photo: PA]

Several people agreed with the woman. One commenter said: “Did you contribute financially when you went to other family members’ for Christmas in previous years? If the answer is yes, then fine.”

Another wrote: “If I were your mum and had come into a sizeable inheritance, I’d pay for the whole dinner. But then I’m not your mum.”

Others, however, felt that asking for money wasn’t right: “It’s rude to ask people to give money if you invite them to your home to eat. A bottle of wine/crackers/dessert contribution is a better way to go. It feels more like a gift than a bill.”

Some were simply blunt: “Don’t offer to host if you can’t afford it.”

One commenter summed the situation up perfectly, writing: “It’s a difficult one. You shouldn’t charge guests. But guests shouldn’t dictate the menu.”

Is it really that wrong to ask for help in paying for and preparing the biggest dinner of the year? We think not – especially when you’re giving up most of your day to cook and tidy up after.

Do you think it’s acceptable to ask for a financial contribution at Christmas? Let us know at @YahooStyleUK.

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