• For Prince Charles, Tradition Is the Way He Can Play a Role in British Politics
    Style
    Town & Country

    For Prince Charles, Tradition Is the Way He Can Play a Role in British Politics

    The new documentary Prince Charles at 70 paints the Prince of Wales as poised to become a modern monarch, but one still tied to centuries-old customs.

  • The Curious Habit Prince Harry Inherited from His Father Prince Charles
    Style
    Town & Country

    The Curious Habit Prince Harry Inherited from His Father Prince Charles

    "We thought this is perfectly normal, everyone must do it."

  • How Billions Makes Its Characters Look (Convincingly) Super Rich
    Style
    Town & Country

    How Billions Makes Its Characters Look (Convincingly) Super Rich

    "Run-of-the-mill rich people seem to have lower standards."

  • OMG: The Top 20 'American Idol' Contestants Were Just Leaked
    Style
    Good Housekeeping

    OMG: The Top 20 'American Idol' Contestants Were Just Leaked

    Obviously, spoiler alert.

  • Style
    Good Housekeeping

    This Is How Kody From 'Sister Wives' Actually Makes a Living

    Well, this is certainly shocking.

  • How to Watch Killing Eve Ahead of the Season Two Premiere
    Style
    Town & Country

    How to Watch Killing Eve Ahead of the Season Two Premiere

    Here's where you can catch up on all the cat-and-mouse drama between Eve and Villanelle.

  • Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s Royal Baby: Everything We Know
    Style
    Glamour

    Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s Royal Baby: Everything We Know

    From the due date to the nursery, here's your go-to guide for all things Baby Sussex.

  • Mel B Revealed She and Geri Halliwell Hooked Up, and Now the Spice Girls Reunion Tour May Be in Jeopardy
    Style
    InStyle

    Mel B Revealed She and Geri Halliwell Hooked Up, and Now the Spice Girls Reunion Tour May Be in Jeopardy

    While filming a new episode of Piers Morgan's Life Stories, Scary Spice admitted that she once had a casual fling with her bandmate Geri Halliwell.

  • Style
    Marie Claire

    Wells Adams Cheered Up Sarah Hyland After She Returned from the Hospital This Weekend

    These two continue to be the absolute cutest.

  • Style
    Marie Claire

    The Queen Reportedly Brought Back This Trusted Aide Just to Keep an Eye on Meghan and Harry

    This is like Game of Thrones-level palace politics.

  • The Cast of 'Victoria' Just Recreated an Iconic Portrait of the Royal Family
    Style
    Town & Country

    The Cast of 'Victoria' Just Recreated an Iconic Portrait of the Royal Family

    Just in time for the show's third season airing in the U.K.

  • Meghan Markle Is Already Planning Her Post-Baby Return
    Style
    InStyle

    Meghan Markle Is Already Planning Her Post-Baby Return

    According to Vanity Fair, Meghan is filling her fall calendar with events, specifically the annual summit for the charity One Young World, which takes place in October in London.

  • In brief: Untitled: The Real Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor; The King’s Evil; Circe – reviews
    Style
    The Guardian

    In brief: Untitled: The Real Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor; The King’s Evil; Circe – reviews

    The Duke and Duchess of Windsor in 1937 after their wedding at the Château de Candé in the Loire Valley. Photograph: Popperfoto/Getty Images Untitled: The Real Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor Anna Pasternak William Collins, £20, pp368Most biographical accounts of Wallis Simpson have painted her as “the American harlot”, as she was known by the British public during her relationship with Edward VIII. Anna Pasternak’s empathetic study of Wallis attempts to redress the balance and emphasises her intelligence, independence and unwillingness to ruin the life of the man she loved. Some will believe Pasternak’s conclusions to be overly sympathetic, and this book does not replace Anne Sebba’s That Woman as the definitive contemporary work about Wallis, but with such aggressive press coverage of Meghan Markle, it is useful to be reminded that perceived royal interlopers have always been treated harshly. The King’s Evil Andrew Taylor HarperCollins, £14.99, pp464The third in the series of Andrew Taylor’s crime novels set in the Restoration era could be the best yet. Moving on from the Great Fire and its aftermath, which dominated his previous books, Taylor’s main characters Cat Lovett and James Marwood find themselves caught up in a conspiracy that spans London’s high and low life alike, as Cat is framed for a murder at Clarendon House and Marwood must prove her innocence. Taylor has a rare knack for conjuring up an authentic historical atmosphere, and his description of a teeming, uncertain London in a state of flux is vivid and compelling. Circe Madeline Miller Bloomsbury, £8.99, pp352Madeline Miller’s excellent Circe ties in with the current vogue for classical revisionism in that it looks at a famous incident from literature from the female perspective. In this novel, the episode from The Odyssey where Odysseus is stranded on Circe’s island becomes, in Miller’s retelling from Circe’s perspective, a stirring account of feminine empowerment and hard-won agency. Yet she never forgets the reason these books have endured is because of the strength of the storytelling, and, as in her debut, The Song of Achilles, this works as the most compelling of fantastical sagas as well.• To order Untitled: The Real Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, The King’s Evil or Circe go to guardianbookshop.com or call 0330 333 6846. Free UK p&p over £15, online orders only. Phone orders min p&p of £1.99

  • Alex Rodriguez Takes His Job as Jennifer Lopez’s "Instagram Boyfriend" Very Seriously
    Style
    Allure

    Alex Rodriguez Takes His Job as Jennifer Lopez’s "Instagram Boyfriend" Very Seriously

    He's fully prepared to serve as her faithful "Instagram husband."

  • The Kardashian-Jenner Family's Complex, Overlapping Dating History
    Style
    Marie Claire

    The Kardashian-Jenner Family's Complex, Overlapping Dating History

    Things were complicated long before the Jordyn Woods drama.

  • Style
    Marie Claire

    This Humiliating Prank Was the Only Thing That Ever Made Kate Middleton Lose Her Cool

    In her defense, she was showered with condoms. In public. At work.

  • How to cut and look after your nails correctly
    Style
    The Guardian

    How to cut and look after your nails correctly

    ‘Fingernails should be given a curve, while toenails should be cut straight across, to prevent ingrowth.’ Posed by a model. Photograph: 4FR/Getty ImagesNails should be kept fairly short. The longer they are, the more easily they are damaged – especially your fingernails, if you work with your hands. If they are fine, you can use a normal clipper; for anything thicker – usually toenails, but sometimes fingernails – you will need a heavy-duty version. Use a nail file for shaping, or if it hurts when you clip your nails. You don’t need to use it in just one direction, but do file gently to avoid damage.Fingernails should be given a curve, while toenails should be cut straight across, to prevent ingrowth. You can cut a little down the sides of your toenails, especially if you are prone to ingrowing toenails, to take them away from the skin. If you have persistent problems with an ingrowing toenail, you will need to see a doctor.Your nails will be softer after a bath or shower, so if you have thicker nails it may be easier to cut them then. With brittle nails, however, cutting them when they are soft may make things worse.There is no harm in giving your cuticles a gentle trim, but don’t overdo it – they protect your nail bed from infection by keeping out debris.You should moisturise your hands and feet, including your nails and cuticles, every day. The thicker the cream, the better. If you use polish, give your nails a break from time to time so that air and moisturiser can reach them and prevent discolouration.Dr Sweta Rai is a spokesperson for the British Association of Dermatologists

  • Lori Loughlin's 'Fuller House' co-stars reference her in Kids' Choice Award speech
    Style
    Megan Johnson

    Lori Loughlin's 'Fuller House' co-stars reference her in Kids' Choice Award speech

    Loughlin's longtime co-stars spoke of sticking together "through the hard times ... no matter how tough it gets."

  • Dr. Dre Praises Daughter for Getting 'Into USC All on Her Own' 6 Years After Making $70M Donation
    Style
    People

    Dr. Dre Praises Daughter for Getting 'Into USC All on Her Own' 6 Years After Making $70M Donation

    Dr. Dre Praises Daughter for Getting Into USC Amid Cheating Scandal

  • Queen Elizabeth's Umbrellas Are Custom Made to Match Her Outfits
    Style
    Marie Claire

    Queen Elizabeth's Umbrellas Are Custom Made to Match Her Outfits

    Here's an inside look at what it takes to create the Queen's trademark rainy day accessory.

  • Style
    Marie Claire

    The 'Clueless' Cast Reunited This Weekend and, Yeah, We're Totally Buggin'

    Prepare to have "Rollin' with the Homies" stuck in your head for the rest of the day.

  • College Admissions Has a Fact-Checking Problem. Here's Why.
    Style
    Town & Country

    College Admissions Has a Fact-Checking Problem. Here's Why.

    All Olivia Jade had to do was send a photo of herself on a rowing machine. Why did nobody double check that she was a legitimate college recruit?

  • Style
    Marie Claire

    Barack Obama Sweetly Congratulates J.Lo and A-Rod on Their Engagement

    "This means the world to us. 44"

  • Horizon by Barry Lopez review – nature in the raw
    Style
    The Guardian

    Horizon by Barry Lopez review – nature in the raw

    Antarctica: ‘Landscape was the great teacher,’ writes Barry Lopez. Photograph: Felipe Trueba/EPA-EFE/Rex/ShutterstockReading Barry Lopez is a religious experience, and that’s not meant entirely as a compliment. His great devotional paean to the light and landscape of the far, frozen north, Arctic Dreams (1986), established him as one of the leading nature writers of his generation and won a host of admirers, from Robert Macfarlane to Margaret Atwood to Sir Ranulph Fiennes. Arctic Dreams was, indeed, an extraordinary book, as was its predecessor, Of Wolves and Men (1978), which was not only a compelling history of the long, troubled relationship between man and animal, but also a stirring evocation of the rugged landscape against which this relationship played out.One notices rather fewer celebrity endorsements for Lopez’s fables and short stories, even though fiction outweighs nonfiction in his career so far. His stories draw heavily on Native American mythology, and are often clunkingly spiritual, sanctimonious and didactic. Whereas in Arctic Dreams the light and desolation of the landscape seem perfectly suited to his austere, exalted register – indeed it feels as if he speaks with the voice of the ice in that book – reading beyond his first two works of nonfiction is a bit of a slog. As even one of his great champions, Robert Macfarlane, admitted in a 2005 article, “it is hard to imagine Lopez ever smiling”.Now we have Horizon, which Lopez describes as an “autobiographical reflection”. It’s the record of a life spent at the dangerous edge of things, and gives the sense of a man driven by a seemingly unquenchable, although largely unexplained, thirst to explore and record the world’s most rugged and inhospitable corners. The book is structured around six more or less hostile environments: Cape Foulweather, a headland near the author’s Oregon home and the site of Captain Cook’s first landfall on the American mainland; Skraeling Island in the high Canadian Arctic; the Galápagos islands; western Kenya’s Turkana uplands; Port Arthur in Tasmania; and, finally, the dizzying isolation of the central Transantarctic mountains.To each of these locations, Lopez brings a host of other travellers, from Cook and Darwin, to Shackleton, to lesser-known adventurers such as the eccentric Ranald MacDonald, to the indigenous inhabitants of the land past and present. He also brings his own wandering history, so that from each site he radiates outwards, making associations between the central journey he describes and other visits to the same or similar locations. Lopez is a scientist, a geologist, an archaeologist, a photographer; he’s a polymath whose interest ranges widely but always returns to the landscape. It’s striking, though, that it’s the final chapter, about Antarctica, that is the most memorable and compelling. There’s a sense of relief when Lopez steps away from it all, into the blinding whiteness of the ice. “The landscape around us, I knew,” he writes, “was the great teacher here. You just had to step into it, with an open mind and an eager heart.” This, you understand, is where the author feels truly at home.In Horizon’s rather perfunctory introduction, Lopez skims over his childhood and early adulthood almost as if they had happened to someone else. Indeed, the first several pages are written in the third person. Here Lopez offers only the most guarded revelations about his feelings, providing the reader with insights that are striking only for their banality – “Travelling, I came to understand, assuaged something in me.” Within this half-hearted autobiographical material (which also peppers the main body of the text) we find clues as to what might have driven the author’s ceaseless wandering – an itinerant childhood strung between California and New York, a departed father, an obsession with maps. More powerful, though, are Lopez’s reflections on the essential unknowability of place. He speaks of having “beheld things so beautiful I couldn’t breathe” and yet recognises that these stunning landscapes are passively hostile to him both physically and epistemologically. “One can never,” he writes, “even by paying the strictest attention at multiple levels, entirely comprehend a single place, no matter how many times one might travel there. This is not only because the place itself is constantly changing but because the deep nature of every place is not transparency. It’s obscurity.” The same might be said of the author of this strangely tight-lipped memoir.• Horizon by Barry Lopez is published by Vintage (£25). To order a copy go to guardianbookshop.com or call 0330 333 6846. Free UK p&p over £15, online orders only. Phone orders min p&p of £1.99

  • Why Meghan Markle Rarely Wears True Maternity Clothes
    Style
    Town & Country

    Why Meghan Markle Rarely Wears True Maternity Clothes

    Plus, the one fashion-forward maternity brand she's sported multiple times.