Advertisement

How to make your home look exactly like The Crown's royal residences

Imelda Staunton as The Queen in The Crown
The Crown's final six episodes will land on Netflix in December (Netflix)

The sixth and final instalment of The Crown, Netflix's original drama about the reign of Queen Elizabeth II, has finally landed on Netflix, with part two to follow this coming week. In addition to providing heartache, humour, and a harrowing reenactment of the royal family's darkest moments, the gritty season has also evoked an interest in regal interiors.

Recreating the grandeur of the royal residences is no small task. From filming inside genuine royal residences to making use of England's stately homes, the regal magic of the royal's private spaces, including the private rooms of Buckingham Palace, is brought to life on screen.

In the wake of Bridgerton, Matthew Lopez's Red White and Royal Blue and The Crown, royalcore interiors have never been more popular.

If the ritzy glamour of royal homes has inspired your own décor desires, Sarah Lloyd, Interior and Paint Specialist at Valspar Paint, has shared six simple styling tips to add a sense of royalty to our own properties.

ROYAL RESIDENCES

A gold touch

Gold elements are heavily accented throughout the royal interiors
Gold elements are heavily accented throughout the royal interiors (Netflix)

Gold is heavily accented throughout the décor at Buckingham Palace, whether in soft furnishings, lighting, picture frames or on the walls.

"Using gold elements throughout soft furnishings, such as curtains, throws and cushions, will give the feeling of old luxury and timeless glamour," says Sarah, who added that gold picture frames and gold-trimmed mirrors are a subtle way of bringing regality into the home.

Regal red

Emma Corrin as Princess Diana in The Crown season four
Emma Corrin as Princess Diana in The Crown season four (Des Willie / Netflix)

Rich red hues are apparent in many of the royal rooms depicted in The Crown. "Incorporating red into your space will evoke an energetic and bold atmosphere, whilst also adding warmth to the space.  It also portrays elegance and a touch of class," Sarah explains.

Red is a notoriously difficult colour to style, so Sarah recommends looking for deep, rich-toned red hues that work well in carpets and rugs, especially when using a vintage pattern.

What goes into bringing the royal family to the big screen? Listen to A Right Royal Podcast for details

Old school chandeliers

Candles and chandeliers illuminate the room as royals attend a state banquet at the Palace of Versailles
Candles and chandeliers illuminate the room as royals attend a state banquet at the Palace of Versailles (Getty)

"Embrace authenticity and regal country living by installing chandeliers into larger, communal rooms. This adds a touch of mood lighting to the room for ambience," Sarah explains.

While modern chandeliers often boast geometric silhouettes and modish silver detailing, car boot sales, vintage furniture stores and charity shops can be a great place to pick up a second-hand or antique chandelier that better reflects the timeless glamour of the royal residences.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Warming fireplaces

Lesley Manville as Princess Margaret in The Crown
Lesley Manville as Princess Margaret in The Crown (Photo Credit: Keith Bernstein)

Many scenes in The Crown are filmed in the beautiful British countryside to reflect the late Queen's beloved Balmoral and Sandringham estates -  and the interiors often feature decadent fireplaces. "A fireplace is a comforting and classic addition to any country home," says Sarah. "If you already have one, consider repainting the space to make it feel more luxurious with dramatic hues. Add a few little touches such as some decorative candles or vases in dynamic shapes to add even more warmth to your fireplace."

Reception spaces

state banquet
A state banquet takes months to prepare for (Getty)

Hosting guests at Buckingham Palace is no ordinary affair. From the lavish decor adorned with seasonal flowers to the meticulously placed tableware from King George IV's 4,000-piece Grand Service (which takes a team of eight three weeks to unpack and repack), state banquets truly are a magnificent display of regality.

While spacious dining rooms are not something we all have in our homes, Sarah suggests looking to our hallways to emulate a sense of grandeur. "Long or wide hallways will look more royal with warmer shades of green, decorated mirrors, picture galleries and floor-runners to bring out the personality of the space," she adds.