Jennifer Grey Finds Inner Happiness to Be the Antidote to Aging

Kelsey Hurwitz
·3 min read

From Woman's Day

In the 1940s, when Jell-o salad and preservative-laden meatloaf was a common staple at countless American dinner tables, actress Jennifer Grey's maternal grandmother was focused on healthy eating. "She was obsessed with Gayelord Hauser, and they never had any white bread or iceberg lettuce," Grey tells Woman's Day. "And my mom did the same with us. I was the weirdo kid with the dried fruit in her lunch and no sugar cereals."

Due to the example set by her mother and grandmother, Grey has always been conscious about what she puts in her body. "When I grew up I longed for sugar snacks and sugar pops and all those things I thought of as the most exotic things in the world when I went to friends' houses," she explains. "But I believe that food is nourishment, and food is to be enjoyed, and food is to make your body happy. And my body is happy when I take care of it."

Grey takes care of her body in myriad ways, too. "I'm like a truffle pig, I just keep going until I find the right thing for myself," she says, and explains that trying different wellness approaches has been key to her overall health regimen. From eating a balanced diet to exercising to meditating, Grey hopes to care for her body as she ages from the inside out, which is why she has partnered with Celltrient, a line of drinks and supplements that aim to provide nutrients directly to your cells.

"I'm such a science nerd," she says. "I'm just fascinated by what's happening in that world of anti-aging. And there is so much new material that's so exciting about the ways in which our body does not have to age in the ways we used to believe it did." She considers her body on a cellular level, and works to improve the health of her cells in order to improve her health everywhere.

Though Grey thinks about about anti-aging in terms of health and delaying or evading the physical troubles that can accompany aging, she tries not to spend too much time worrying about the superficial.

"I find the obsession with face or skin or aging can really be a slippery slope," she says. "Because when I'm not looking in the mirror I feel so great about myself, and then when I start to look and study and compare and despair it makes me so sad about our culture. Because I've never been happier in my life than I am right now." Grey says that when she had the so-called "perfect" physical attributes of youth she struggled with feeling good enough. And regardless of the ever-changing beauty standards that are in style, she's learned that looking at your body with gratitude instead of judgment is a healthier mindset. "The truth is that it's really accepting yourself and loving on yourself, and thanking my body every day for bringing me here [that's important]," she says.

And though she's the first to admit it sounds corny, Grey holds tight to the belief that anti-aging comes from finding inner happiness. "You want to be able to put your head on the pillow at night and feel good about your day."

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