• Jodrell Bank Observatory becomes world heritage site
    Style
    The Guardian

    Jodrell Bank Observatory becomes world heritage site

    Unesco recognises Cheshire home of Lovell telescope for contribution to astronomical research. Jodrell Bank Observatory in Cheshire, which has been at the forefront of astronomical research for decades, has been added to the Unesco world heritage list. The observatory, which is owned by the University of Manchester, joins historic sites such as Stonehenge, Machu Picchu, the Great Wall of China and the Taj Mahal on the list. It opened in 1945 and is the home of the Lovell telescope, the world’s third largest steerable radio telescope, which weighs 3,200 tonnes. The heritage minister Rebecca Pow said she was delighted the observatory had become the UK’s 32nd world heritage site. She said the coveted listing would “make sure that this remarkable site will continue to inspire young scientists and astronomers all over the world”. Pow added: “The research completed here has transformed our understanding of the universe and it is right that this is recognised.” The site tracked US and Russian crafts during the space race and pioneered radio astronomy using radio waves instead of visible light to understand the universe. The observatory has featured in BBC’s Stargazing Live series, Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and Doctor Who. Teresa Anderson, the director of the Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre, said: “This is wonderful news and a great day in the history of Jodrell Bank. It honours the pioneering work of Sir Bernard Lovell and the early scientists here, together with the world-leading research that continues to this day. “Receiving this recognition will help us tell their story and the story of the communities connected to the site both across the UK and worldwide.”

  • Early exposure to peanuts may actually prevent allergies
    Style
    Simone Olivero

    Early exposure to peanuts may actually prevent allergies

    In the last decade, peanut allergies have become a growing concern for parents — according to Health Canada, it’s one of the most common food allergies. Under the current Health Canada guidelines, parents are told to exclusively breastfeed (or use a breastfeeding alternative, like formula) before the age of 6 months. After that time, they can begin experimenting with solid foods and common allergens like peanut-based products, fish, wheat, milk, soy and eggs.

  • Thumb sucking and nail biting may not be gross habits after all
    Style
    Simone Olivero

    Thumb sucking and nail biting may not be gross habits after all

    “Our findings are consistent with the hygiene theory that early exposure to dirt or germs reduces the risk of developing allergies,” Sears said in a press release. The study comes out of New Zealand’s Dunedin School of Medicine and looked at 1,037 kids born between 1972 and 1973. In the early years, parents were asked to rate whether their children were frequent thumb suckers or nail biters.