• 'You don't owe the world a bikini': Canadian blogger praised for empowering Instagram post
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    Elizabeth Di Filippo

    'You don't owe the world a bikini': Canadian blogger praised for empowering Instagram post

    "I can’t let my zero confidence ruin my kid's summer."

  • Frank and Oak's massive sale is for a really good cause
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    Yahoo Canada Shopping Editors

    Frank and Oak's massive sale is for a really good cause

    "We’re pledging $5 from every sale item purchased to help remove waste from our shoreline."

  • Score major deals on designer items with the SSENSE's summer sale
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    Kate Mendonca

    Score major deals on designer items with the SSENSE's summer sale

    Take up to 70% off on designers like Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, and Saint Laurent.

  • Sephora Canada Day exclusives you don't want to miss
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    Alyssa Tria

    Sephora Canada Day exclusives you don't want to miss

    The cosmetics giant has teamed up with Canadian brands on limited-edition makeup, hair and skincare sets and products.

  • Goop sunscreen controversy brings Health Canada loophole to light — here's what you need to know about sunscreen safety
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    Gail Johnson

    Goop sunscreen controversy brings Health Canada loophole to light — here's what you need to know about sunscreen safety

    “Unfortunately, the word 'natural' can be misleading to consumers at times."

  • Canadian mom organizes free hugs to celebrate Newfoundland Pride parade
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    Elizabeth Di Filippo

    Canadian mom organizes free hugs to celebrate Newfoundland Pride parade

    "Everyone needs a hug at some point."

  • Shop Frank And Oak's sale now and save 20% next month: Our favourite picks
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    Yahoo Canada Shopping Editors

    Shop Frank And Oak's sale now and save 20% next month: Our favourite picks

    If you spend $100 in store or online between June 13-16, you’ll get 20 per cent off on your next purchase.

  • 'It's a war on people': Alberta dad slams province's 'war on drugs' after son born opiate dependent
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    Elizabeth Di Filippo

    'It's a war on people': Alberta dad slams province's 'war on drugs' after son born opiate dependent

    "There’s no difference between my son’s shining face and anybody else."

  • Canadian politician defends Selma Blair after fans accuse her of cultural appropriation
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    Elizabeth Di Filippo

    Canadian politician defends Selma Blair after fans accuse her of cultural appropriation

    "It's totally cool for anyone to rock a turban."

  • These parents went into debt to get their children private, long-term drug treatment
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    CBC

    These parents went into debt to get their children private, long-term drug treatment

    Some parents of drug-addicted children are cashing in retirement savings, remortgaging houses and sinking into debt to pay for privately run, long-term drug treatment.It's an expensive gamble, but one they are driven to take after growing frustrated with the lack of publicly funded treatment programs that extend longer than 28 days."My son wasn't my son for years and this was the hope of getting my boy back," said Stacey Bereza, a Saskatoon woman who paid $82,000 for private treatment for her son, Kaden, in British Columbia.The majority of Saskatchewan's 350 treatment beds are for detox or 28-day programs. There is some flexibility, usually a couple weeks, but only nine beds for adults in the province are dedicated to residential treatment of 90 days.The province says long-term treatment is available by accessing a patchwork of different services — detox, inpatient treatment, transitional beds, outpatient counselling — but often with gaps in between. > It's absolutely a national issue. Every province struggles with this. \- Dr. Peter Butt, addictions specialist"We're setting them up for failure," said Dr. Peter Butt, a leading addictions specialist in Saskatchewan. The 28-day model that has become standard in Canada was a misguided replica of the U.S. system, says Butt."Twenty-eight days is what American … health insurance companies would pay for recovery services down in the States. That's it," he said. "And so the programs were modelled based upon the funding structure. It had nothing to do with efficacy, nothing to do with evidence, nothing to do with outcome."As epidemics involving opioids and methamphetamine have spiked in recent years, shining a spotlight on the reach of substance abuse, there have been calls to have addiction talked about as a chronic disease, similar to diabetes or cancer — and treatment reflect as much.Butt is blunt that there is no one-size-fits-all, cookie-cutter solution for drug treatment. But he says it should include a minimum of three months of continuous treatment — although not restricted to residential facilities — followed by transitional support that lasts at least one year."It's absolutely a national issue. Every province struggles with this. You might have projects or programs or places where there's an oasis of good practice … but in terms of a provincial-wide, sustained system of care, we have yet to see it in the country," Butt said.Kathy Willerth, director of mental health and addictions with Saskatchewan's Ministry of Health, says her goal is to close any gaps in the province's system and guarantee "90 days of engagement" with "a warm handoff" when people move between treatment services. A recent budget increase will add 50 transitional beds, she said.Broke or broken-heartedCBC News spoke to multiple women in Saskatchewan who described the heartbreaking and financially crippling impact of having a child fall through the cracks.Andrew Nordal admits he would lie, steal and bully his mother, Ronni, in a bid to get money to buy drugs."I knew how to push my mom's button and get what I wanted," said the 30-year-old. He became addicted to cocaine in high school and later, crystal meth."I would steal. I would manipulate my family for money.… I was dealing drugs. I was breaking in drug dealer's houses to get drugs."Ronni Nordal repeatedly arranged for her son to get counselling and drug treatment in Saskatchewan's public health system. He completed a 28-day program in Saskatoon three separate times. On the last stint, he was allowed to stay a couple of extra weeks.Each time, he relapsed. His parents were at their breaking point."I was exhausted," Ronni Nordal said. "And I couldn't fight it, and I didn't know what to do."We both loved him with all our hearts. But at some point, we were going to have to not have him in our lives. And we came to the conclusion that for us to be OK with ourselves, we were going to try one more thing."That one more thing was private, long-term residential treatment in B.C. Nordal was quoted between $7,000 and $12,000 a month. Nordal, a lawyer, did as much research as she could online, but was leery of unregulated private facilities."As someone phoning, you don't know if it's a gimmick.… You don't know if it's a hotel that's fancy."Andrew's story so far is one of success. In October 2016, he began five months of intensive residential rehab at the Last Door Recovery Centre in New Westminster, B.C., followed by several more months of counselling and after-care in the facility's transitional housing program. He's been clean for 2½ years.It cost $40,000.'This was the hope of getting my boy back'Stacey Bereza's son, Kaden, 24, experimented with painkillers from a medicine cabinet in high school, then moved on to heroin and fentanyl. As a 911 dispatcher for the Saskatoon Police Service, Bereza had handled plenty of overdose calls at work. She was determined to get her son help — and fast.An addictions counsellor in Saskatoon urged Bereza to skip the waiting lists and 28-day programs, she said, and immediately book her son into a private facility in B.C. She convinced Kaden to give it a try. A financial crunch"I said, 'Don't do this for me. That's a waste of your time. Don't do it for me. Do it for you. If you don't want this. I'm done. I've done all I can do for you.'"She flew with her son to Nanaimo, B.C., where he received medically supervised detox and intensive inpatient treatment at Edgewood Treatment Centre, which also has facilities in Toronto and Montreal.As is common, Kaden's recovery has included three relapses. But he's been clean for nearly three years and still receives regular counselling at the facility — paid for by Bereza.In total, his treatment has cost $82,000."Credit cards, line of credit — it's a monthly financial crunch. I feel it monthly. But I look at my son's smile today and it was worth it," Bereza said.'I spent a lot of time swearing'Cheryl Deschene's rough-around-the-edges son, Jordan, first experimented with crack cocaine when he was 13.She spent his teenage years visiting him in juvenile detention centres or hunting him down on Regina's streets. She wasn't afraid to beat down a drug dealer's door, holding a baseball bat, demanding to see her son."No one wants mama rat-a-tat-tat at their door, especially when she's mad," Deschene said.More often, though, she felt frustrated and helpless.> He'd be sobbing … and saying, 'I can't do this anymore. I hate it. I'm sad. I don't like it. I'm scared. Mom, what do I do? \- Cheryl DescheneWhile her son was frequently incarcerated, she said there were windows of opportunity when he wanted help. She tried to get it for him — and failed."He'd be sobbing … and saying, 'I can't do this anymore. I hate it. I'm sad. I don't like it. I'm scared. Mom, what do I do?'" Deschene was able to get her son into detox, but when he finished, there would always be a waiting list of four to six weeks for followup treatment programs."And when they want help, when they're reaching out for help, it's like now or never," Deschene said. "It's such a disjointed system. So, as a mom, on the phone, I spent a lot of time swearing, like, 'Are you kidding me?'"An urn in the bedroomPaying for private treatment wasn't a viable option for Deschene."I was a single mom. I could not afford to spend upward of $10,000, usually much more, to send my kid out of province. Would I have done it? In a heartbeat."In her bedroom, Deschene points to Jordan's picture on the nightstand and an urn in the corner."Typically I say 'Good night.' Sometimes I call him a jerk for leaving me."Jordan died of an overdose four years ago, at 27, a day after he was released from the Regina Provincial Correctional Centre.While Deschene acknowledges many factors contributed to Jordan's death, she feels the public system failed her son.

  • Memorial Day sales that Canadians can take advantage of
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    Yahoo Canada Shopping Editors

    Memorial Day sales that Canadians can take advantage of

    The can't-miss sales of the long weekend.

  • Doctors remove tick embedded in 9-year-old's eardrum
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    Elizabeth Di Filippo

    Doctors remove tick embedded in 9-year-old's eardrum

    He had been complaining of "buzzing noises."

  • What The Health?! Oilers' owner's life-threatening illness is a scary reminder of antibiotic resistance
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    Gail Johnson

    What The Health?! Oilers' owner's life-threatening illness is a scary reminder of antibiotic resistance

    “When you’ve reached that point, then it really becomes a race against time.”

  • Hot deal alert: These summer essentials are all 50 per cent off at Old Navy
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    Yahoo Canada Shopping Editors

    Hot deal alert: These summer essentials are all 50 per cent off at Old Navy

    But hurry, the sale ends Monday!

  • Canadian man removes Nazi flag flying above local home and burns it: 'It has to end now'
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    Paulina Cachero

    Canadian man removes Nazi flag flying above local home and burns it: 'It has to end now'

    When it appeared as though authorities weren’t going to take action, a Canadian man removed the Nazi flag from the home and burned it in a live video streamed on Facebook.

  • Gwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle brand goop set to open Toronto pop-up store
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    Elizabeth Di Filippo

    Gwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle brand goop set to open Toronto pop-up store

    The 10 must-have goop items.

  • Offer free birth control for youth, Canadian Paediatric Society says
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    CBC

    Offer free birth control for youth, Canadian Paediatric Society says

    Birth control pills, condoms and all other contraceptives should be available at no cost for youth in Canada age 25 and under, the Canadian Paediatric Society says.In a position statement released on Thursday, the society called for confidential access to contraceptives to minimize the personal and financial costs of unintended pregnancies, such as derailing life plans for education and increasing the likelihood of needing social assistance.More than 25 per cent of youth who do not wish to become pregnant don't use contraceptives consistently, studies suggest. About 50,000 unplanned pregnancies a year occur among those under age 24 in Canada, the society said.Canadian contraceptive care providers have said cost is the largest barrier to access, and youth are disproportionately affected."We know that for an adolescent paying out of pocket, cost can be quite substantial so that even the $10 to $15 a month that the pill might cost or the $8 for a box of condoms, sometimes, even that's a challenge," said Dr. Giosi Di Meglio, one of the authors of the new paper and an adolescent medicine specialist at Montreal Children's Hospital.  "Solving the cost problem helps."That's why the group urges federal, provincial and territorial governments to move quickly to: * Cover all contraceptives, including condoms, which also protect against sexually transmitted infections, under government health plans until age 25. * Provide no-cost contraceptives to health-care service clinics for youth. * Ensure that privately insured youth have equal access to confidential, no-cost contraception. * Continue to make short-acting birth control pills, patches and injections available at no cost until age 25 should they become available over the counter.A small study last year based in Quebec, which has a public prescription drug insurance plan, suggested about 10 per cent of youth didn't get the contraception they wanted or had to stop using it because of cost. Those findings reflect what pediatricians across the country see in their practice, she said. Coverage falls apart"I think because we have universal health-care coverage … we often think that we've done the part that's really important, which is getting the prescription in hand. "But the other piece of it is going from having a prescription to actually having the contraceptive, and that's where things fall apart in Canada."Last year, the society recommended long-acting reversible contraceptives such as IUDs as the most effective form of contraception. The up-front costs can be $300.Confidentiality is also key. Pediatrician Margo Lane in Winnipeg, a member of the society's adolescent health committee, gave the example of a girl whose father was sometimes violent. The family was covered under his private pharmaceutical insurance plan, and the girl was scared of having her father find out if she purchased contraception through the plan. An individual like that could benefit from the proposed universal access to contraception, Lane said, although she also stressed that young people should have open discussions with parents and seek their guidance.

  • Floodwater can pose a risk to pets' health: What you need to know
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    Gail Johnson

    Floodwater can pose a risk to pets' health: What you need to know

    The flooding that continues to wreak havoc across Eastern Canada, Quebec and Ontario has many pet owners wondering what to do with their furry friends in case of a flood. A veterinarian in Moncton, N.B. has already treated several animals for flood-related injuries and illnesses this season. Dogs have stepped on sharp objects including nails and are at risk of gastrointestinal infections if they have been exposed to floodwater that could be contaminated with fecal matter, oil, or bacteria like Cryptosporidium or Giardia, Brett Tremble told Global News.

  • 'It's kind of a gut punch': Did Khloé Kardashian's clothing line rip off this Canadian small business?
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    Elizabeth Di Filippo

    'It's kind of a gut punch': Did Khloé Kardashian's clothing line rip off this Canadian small business?

    “What’s her net worth, $40 million? How am I supposed to tackle this?”

  • What The Health?! What you need to know about the deadly death cap mushroom
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    Gail Johnson

    What The Health?! What you need to know about the deadly death cap mushroom

    “It doesn’t have the flashy colours that people assume are poisonous.”

  • How the Ontario government's cuts are affecting my family
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    Derek Weidl

    How the Ontario government's cuts are affecting my family

    "If you don't think this is happening right in front of your eyes, then you aren't paying attention."

  • Health Canada sets plain-packaging rules for tobacco, to take effect in November
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    The Canadian Press

    Health Canada sets plain-packaging rules for tobacco, to take effect in November

    Canadian cigarette packs will have to be plain drab brown with standardized layouts and lettering under new rules that kick in next Nov. 9, Health Canada says. Officials said plain packages will increase the impact of graphic health warnings about the dangers of smoking, keeping them from getting lost amid colourful designs and branding. The government wants to stop cigarette companies from using their packs as tiny ads for their products, insisting even on a single shape and design for the packs themselves — meaning soft packs are out, as are creative designs with bevelled edges and any other distinctive features.

  • More young people are dying from the flu — here's what you need to know
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    Gail Johnson

    More young people are dying from the flu — here's what you need to know

    "The individual risk of death is still low for otherwise healthy young people.”

  • These are the best home products of 2019 as voted by Canadians
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    Sarah Rohoman

    These are the best home products of 2019 as voted by Canadians

    From the best fabric softener to an enviable dishwasher, see what household products Canadians are loving.